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Sanders, Harris only Dem debaters to favor eliminating private health insurance

Sanders, Harris only Dem debaters to favor eliminating private health insurance
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Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersDeVos knocks free college push as 'socialist takeover of higher education' The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Capital One — Giuliani denies discussing preemptive pardon with Trump Manchin: Ocasio-Cortez 'more active on Twitter than anything else' MORE (I-Vt.) and Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisSenate GOP's campaign arm rakes in M as Georgia runoffs heat up Biden, Harris to sit with CNN's Tapper in first post-election joint interview The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Capital One — Giuliani denies discussing preemptive pardon with Trump MORE (D-Calif.) were the only candidates in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary debate Thursday to say they would eliminate private health insurance as part of their health care reform plans. 

Asked by NBC moderator Lester Holt who is in favor of eliminating private health insurance in favor of a single-payer, government-run health plan like "Medicare for All," Sanders and Harris raised their hands. 

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We will “tell insurance companies and the drug companies their day is gone, that health care is a human right, not something to make huge profits off of,” Sanders said. 

Harris and Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandOvernight Defense: Defense bill among Congress's year-end scramble | Iranian scientist's assassination adds hurdles to Biden's plan on nuclear deal | Navy scrapping USS Bonhomme Richard after fire Democratic senators urge Facebook to take action on anti-Muslim bigotry Social media responds to Harris making history: 'I feel like our ancestors are rejoicing' MORE (D-N.Y.) are both co-sponsors of Sanders’s Medicare for All bill in the Senate, but Gillibrand did not raise her hand. 

Gillibrand said the quickest way to get to universal health care, where all Americans have insurance, is to let people “buy in” to the Medicare program. 

“I believe we need to get to universal health care as a right, not a privilege, to single payer. The quickest way you get there is you create competition with the insurers,” she said. 

Holt asked the same question of the Democratic presidential candidates who participated in Tuesday’s debate. Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOn The Money: McConnell offering new coronavirus relief bill | Biden introduces economic team, vows swift action on relief | Rare Mnuchin-Powell spat takes center stage at COVID-19 hearing Biden introduces economic team, vows swift action on struggling economy Louisville mayor declares racism a public health crisis MORE (D-Mass.) and New York City Mayor Bill de BlasioBill de BlasioLawyer who inspired ABC's 'For Life' to run for mayor of New York Rockefeller Center Christmas tree viewing limited to 5 minutes The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - Coast-to-coast fears about post-holiday COVID-19 spread MORE were the only ones to raise their hands.