Senate will not vote on bipartisan health costs bill before leaving for August

Senate will not vote on bipartisan health costs bill before leaving for August
© Greg Nash

The Senate will not vote on a bipartisan measure aimed at lowering health care costs before lawmakers leave Washington for the August recess. 

Sens. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderThe Hill's Morning Report - How will Trump be received in Dayton and El Paso? McConnell faces pressure to bring Senate back for gun legislation Criminal justice reform should extend to student financial aid MORE (R-Tenn.) and Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayOvernight Health Care: Planned Parenthood to leave federal family planning program absent court action | Democrats demand Trump withdraw rule on transgender health | Cummings, Sanders investigate three drug companies for 'obstructing' probe Democrats demand Trump officials withdraw rule on transgender health The Hill's Morning Report - Progressives, centrists clash in lively Democratic debate MORE (D-Wash.) said in a joint statement that the Senate “does not have time before the August recess” to consider the bill. 

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Alexander had pushed for the measure to get a vote this month. Alexander and Murray are now expressing hope that the Senate will vote on the bill upon returning in September. 

“We are engaged in very productive conversations about this legislation with our colleagues in the Senate and the House, and will continue to work during August and into September to move this legislation forward,” they said. 

The Senate Health Committee approved the measure in an overwhelming vote of 20-3 in June, but since then the measure has run into some resistance. 

Powerful doctor and hospital groups have been fighting the measure over its provision aimed at protecting patients from getting massive “surprise” medical bills from out-of-network doctors. 

Doctors and hospitals are worried that the way the provision is set up will end up cutting their payment rates. 

Alexander has been in talks with Sen. Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyI'm not a Nazi, I'm just a dude: What it's like to be the other Steve King Washington takes historic step forward on paid parental leave The 23 Republicans who opposed Trump-backed budget deal MORE (R-La.) about changing the surprise billing provision to address some of doctors’ concerns. 

A range of other senators have placed “holds” on the legislation for various reasons. 

Still, there are some signs that the legislation will eventually move forward. 

The package includes a measure sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellAre Democrats turning Trump-like? House Democrat calls for gun control: Cities can ban plastic straws but 'we can't ban assault weapons?' Churches are arming and training congregants in response to mass shootings: report MORE (R-Ky.) to raise the age to buy tobacco from 18 to 21. The inclusion of that McConnell priority makes it more likely that McConnell will bring the package up for a vote. 

The measure could be combined with other health care measures that face a deadline at the end of September, such as funding for community health centers. 

In addition to that measure and the surprise billing protections, the package includes a range of other provisions such as banning anti-competitive provisions in hospital contracts with insurers that can raise costs. 

Alexander sought to find bipartisan provisions that steer clear of the divisive debate over ObamaCare and have a better chance of passing.