Coalition to air anti-Medicare for All ads during Democratic debates

A coalition of hospitals, insurance companies and drugmakers that oppose "Medicare for All" will air national television ads blasting the proposal during this week's Democratic primary debates. 

Partnership for America's Health Care Future, which is funded by influential health care groups like PhRMA, the American Hospital Association and the American Medical Association, will air the ads Tuesday and Wednesday nights as part of a six-figure television and digital campaign targeting the proposal and other expansions of Medicare. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Medicare for All is likely to be a big focus in both debates, as its author, Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTammy Duckworth is the epitome of the American Dream On The Money: Deficit rises to record .7 trillion amid pandemic: CBO | Democrats sidestep budget deal by seeking 0B in emergency spending | House panel advances spending bill with funding boost to IRS Biden-Sanders unity task force calls for Fed, US Postal Service consumer banking MORE (I-Vt.), is one of the top tier candidates running for president.

His plan is also backed at least in part by other Democratic presidential candidates including Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic Unity Taskforce unveils party platform recommendations Progressive activist Ady Barkan endorses Biden, urges him to pick Warren as VP Congress must act now to fix a Social Security COVID-19 glitch and expand, not cut, benefits MORE (N.Y), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisDemocrats awash with cash in battle for Senate Tammy Duckworth hits back at Tucker Carlson: 'Walk a mile in my legs' The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump wants schools to reopen, challenged on 'harmless' COVID-19 remark MORE (Calif.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerData shows seven Senate Democrats have majority non-white staffs New Jersey incumbents steamroll progressive challengers in primaries Amy Kennedy wins NJ primary to face GOP's Van Drew MORE (N.J.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandDemocratic lawmakers call for expanding, enshrining LGBTQ rights The Hill's 12:30 Report: Fauci 'aspirationally hopeful' of a vaccine by winter The Hill's Morning Report - Officials crack down as COVID-19 cases soar MORE (N.Y.)

In the ad, actors say they don't want to be "forced" into a "one-size fits all government insurance system.

It targets not just Sanders's proposal, but the public option plan put forth by Democratic front-runner and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden says he will rejoin WHO on his first day in office Tammy Duckworth is the epitome of the American Dream Mexico's president uses US visit to tout ties with Trump MORE

Sanders's plan would move the U.S. to a single-payer health care system run by the government, virtually eliminating all private insurance. 

Biden's plan would keep the current system, but add a government-run public option to compete with private insurance companies. 

Both plans are fiercely opposed by insurance companies, hospitals and drugmakers who would see profit losses. 

The ads argue the plans would lead to "higher taxes and higher premiums" and "lower quality care." 

“Rather than handing more control over to politicians and bureaucrats, we should build and improve upon what’s working in American health care, while coming together to fix what isn’t," said Lauren Crawford Shaver, the Partnership’s executive director.

Sanders, who will be on the debate stage Tuesday night, often blasts the health care industry's "greed" in defending his Medicare for All plan. 

"We cannot continue to allow private health insurance companies to make massive profits by denying care to those that need it," Sanders tweeted Monday. "That is fundamentally immoral and that is why we need Medicare for all."