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Poll: 1 in 5 US adults report trouble affording prescription drugs

Poll: 1 in 5 US adults report trouble affording prescription drugs
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About 1 in 5 U.S. adults say that they or someone in their household has been unable to afford drugs that were prescribed to them in the past 12 months, according to a new poll from Gallup and West Health. 

The survey found that 22.9 percent of U.S. adults said there had been a time in the past year when their household was unable to pay for drugs they were prescribed, up from 18.9 percent in January. 

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The poll illustrates the struggles many Americans have paying for medication at a time when lowering drug prices is an intense subject of debate in Washington. 

President TrumpDonald John TrumpMore than 300 military family members endorse Biden Five takeaways from the final Trump-Biden debate Biden: 'I would transition from the oil industry' MORE has railed against high drug prices and has proposed some steps, including linking certain Medicare drug prices to lower ones paid in other countries, but he has not taken any major action that has gone into effect yet. 

The Gallup survey finds the public is mostly negative on Trump’s performance on the issue so far, with 66 percent of adults saying he has done “not very much” or “none at all” to fight high drug prices. Twenty percent said he had done a “fair amount” and 7 percent said “a great deal.”

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump predicts GOP will win the House Hillicon Valley: Five takeaways on new election interference from Iran, Russia | Schumer says briefing on Iranian election interference didn't convince him effort was meant to hurt Trump | Republicans on Senate panel subpoena Facebook, Twitter CEOs | On The Money: Pelosi cites progress, but says COVID-19 relief deal might be post-election | Eviction crisis sparked by pandemic disproportionately hits minorities | Weekly jobless claims fall to 787K MORE (D-Calif.) is pushing a sweeping bill to allow the secretary of Health and Human Services to negotiate lower prices on up to 250 drugs per year. Republicans oppose that measure, warning it would hinder the development of new treatments, but some are supporting smaller measures like a bill in the Senate from Sens. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOn The Money: Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi bullish, Trump tempers optimism | Analysis: Nearly 1M have run out of jobless benefits Grassley: Voters should be skeptical of Biden's pledge to not raise middle class taxes GOP to Trump: Focus on policy MORE (R-Iowa) and Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenPlaintiff and defendant from Obergefell v. Hodges unite to oppose Barrett's confirmation Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing House Democrats slam FCC chairman over 'blatant attempt to help' Trump MORE (D-Ore.). 

Drug companies say that the problem is insurers and pharmacy benefit managers who are not passing discounts they receive on to consumers.