Trump reversed course on flavored e-cigarette ban over fear of job losses: report

President TrumpDonald John TrumpCDC updates website to remove dosage guidance on drug touted by Trump Trump says he'd like economy to reopen 'with a big bang' but acknowledges it may be limited Graham backs Trump, vows no money for WHO in next funding bill MORE reportedly halted plans to ban some e-cigarette flavors earlier this month due to fears of job losses.

The Washington Post reported Sunday that Trump abruptly backed off the proposed ban, which would have halted the sales of mint flavors as well as candy and fruit flavors, because he feared it could have a negative impact on his campaign as he sought to tout the economy. 

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Trump, who had previously supported the ban reportedly on the urging of first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpTrump shakes up WH communications team The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump gets new press secretary in latest shake-up Grisham leaves role as White House press secretary MORE and his daughter Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie TrumpPrivate equity firm with ties to Kushner asks Trump administration to relax rules on loan program: report Overnight Health Care: CDC recommends face coverings in public | Resistance to social distancing sparks new worries | Controversy over change of national stockpile definition | McConnell signals fourth coronavirus bill On The Money: Economy sheds 701K jobs in March | Why unemployment checks could take weeks | Confusion surrounds 9B in small-business loans MORE, a White House adviser, refused to sign a decision memo ahead of a planned morning news conference on Nov. 4, according to the Post.

“He didn’t know much about the issue and was just doing it for Melania and Ivanka,” said a senior administration official, according to the Post.

A White House spokesperson refused to comment to the Post on the proposed ban or Trump's reported reversal, adding that the administration was committed to protecting children's health.

“President Trump and this administration are committed to responsibly protecting the health of children,” Judd Deere told the newspaper. “At this time, we are in an ongoing rulemaking process, and I will not speculate on the final outcome.”

E-cigarette manufacturers have come under scrutiny in recent months due to a rise in lung illnesses in teens and young adults thought to be related to vaping amid explosive popularity of the devices among younger Americans.