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Trump reversed course on flavored e-cigarette ban over fear of job losses: report

President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump vows 'No more money for RINOS,' instead encouraging donations to his PAC Federal judge rules 'QAnon shaman' too dangerous to be released from jail Pelosi says Capitol riot was one of the most difficult moments of her career MORE reportedly halted plans to ban some e-cigarette flavors earlier this month due to fears of job losses.

The Washington Post reported Sunday that Trump abruptly backed off the proposed ban, which would have halted the sales of mint flavors as well as candy and fruit flavors, because he feared it could have a negative impact on his campaign as he sought to tout the economy. 

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Trump, who had previously supported the ban reportedly on the urging of first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpMissouri pastor faces backlash after suggesting wives should lose weight, strive to look like Melania Trump The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by ExxonMobil - FBI director testifies on Jan. 6 Capitol attack Overnight Health Care: Senate to vote on .9 trillion relief bill this week | J&J vaccine rollout begins | CDC warns against lifting restrictions MORE and his daughter Ivanka TrumpIvanka TrumpTrump Jr. was deposed in inauguration funds probe Former Trump officials eye bids for political office The Hill's Morning Report - Disaster politics hobble Cruz, Cuomo MORE, a White House adviser, refused to sign a decision memo ahead of a planned morning news conference on Nov. 4, according to the Post.

“He didn’t know much about the issue and was just doing it for Melania and Ivanka,” said a senior administration official, according to the Post.

A White House spokesperson refused to comment to the Post on the proposed ban or Trump's reported reversal, adding that the administration was committed to protecting children's health.

“President Trump and this administration are committed to responsibly protecting the health of children,” Judd Deere told the newspaper. “At this time, we are in an ongoing rulemaking process, and I will not speculate on the final outcome.”

E-cigarette manufacturers have come under scrutiny in recent months due to a rise in lung illnesses in teens and young adults thought to be related to vaping amid explosive popularity of the devices among younger Americans.