Key House and Senate health leaders reach deal to stop surprise medical bills

Key House and Senate health care leaders in both parties reached a deal on Sunday on legislation to protect patients from surprise medical bills. 

The deal between House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Frank Pallone Jr.Frank Joseph PallonePharma execs say FDA will not lower standards for coronavirus vaccine Dem chairmen urge CMS to prevent nursing homes from seizing stimulus payments Federal watchdog finds cybersecurity vulnerabilities in FCC systems MORE (D-N.J.), Rep. Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenTrump order on drug prices faces long road to finish line Ignore the misinformation: The FDA will ensure the safety of any COVID-19 vaccine Hillicon Valley: Trump backs potential Microsoft, TikTok deal, sets September deadline | House Republicans request classified TikTok briefing | Facebook labels manipulated Pelosi video MORE (R-Ore.), the top Republican on that panel, and Senate Health Committee Chairman Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderGraham: GOP will confirm Trump's Supreme Court nominee before the election The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Washington on edge amid SCOTUS vacancy This week: Supreme Court fight over Ginsburg's seat upends Congress's agenda MORE (R-Tenn.) is a step forward for the effort, which is seen as a rare area of possible bipartisan action this year. 

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President TrumpDonald John TrumpBubba Wallace to be driver of Michael Jordan, Denny Hamlin NASCAR team Graham: GOP will confirm Trump's Supreme Court nominee before the election Southwest Airlines, unions call for six-month extension of government aid MORE has also called for action on the issue. The legislation would protect patients from getting hit with massive bills when they go to the emergency room and one of the doctors caring for them happens to be outside their insurance network. 

“I do not think it is possible to write a bill that has broader agreement than this among Senate and House Democrats and Republicans on Americans’ number one financial concern: what they pay out of their own pockets for health care,” Alexander said in a statement. 

The deal also includes other health care measures, such as an extension of funding for community health centers, raising the purchasing age for tobacco to 21 and drug pricing transparency measures. 

Backers of the deal are hoping to include it in a must-pass government funding deal that faces a Dec. 20 deadline. 

There are still obstacles, though. Congressional leadership has not yet signed on to the deal.

There are also still disagreements over the details of the surprise medical billing legislation, with doctors and hospitals lobbying hard on the issue and worried about cuts to their payments. 

It was not yet clear on Sunday whether the lawmakers more aligned with doctors and hospitals would sign on to this deal. 

Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayTrump health officials grilled over reports of politics in COVID-19 response CDC director pushes back on Caputo claim of 'resistance unit' at agency The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by The Air Line Pilots Association - Pence lauds Harris as 'experienced debater'; Trump, Biden diverge over debate prep MORE (D-Wash.), the top Democrat on the Senate Health Committee, also was not listed among the supporters of the deal. 

"Senator Murray believes the overall agreement takes important steps forward on a number of issues impacting patients and families, and is working with some members of her caucus on concerns they still have," said Helen Hare, a spokeswoman for Murray. "She didn't want to sign onto a press release until those were worked through."

Sens. Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyCoushatta tribe begins long road to recovery after Hurricane Laura Senators offer disaster tax relief bill Bottom line MORE (R-La.), Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanCongress needs to prioritize government digital service delivery Senate Democrats demand answers on migrant child trafficking during pandemic Hillicon Valley: Feds warn hackers targeting critical infrastructure | Twitter exploring subscription service | Bill would give DHS cyber agency subpoena power MORE (D-N.H.), and Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetOVERNIGHT ENERGY: House Democrats tee up vote on climate-focused energy bill next week | EPA reappoints controversial leader to air quality advisory committee | Coronavirus creates delay in Pentagon research for alternative to 'forever chemicals' Senate Democrats demand White House fire controversial head of public lands agency Next crisis, keep people working and give them raises MORE (D-Colo.), who had backed a rival bill more favored by doctors groups, released a statement sounding generally supportive of the deal but stopped short of fully endorsing it, saying "final details" needed to be worked out. 

"As our discussions continue around the final details, we are encouraged that we’re one step closer to giving patients these vital protections," the senators said. "Patients have waited long enough, and we remain hopeful that we can get this done by the end of the year.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGraham: GOP will confirm Trump's Supreme Court nominee before the election Trump puts Supreme Court fight at center of Ohio rally The Memo: Dems face balancing act on SCOTUS fight MORE (R-Ky.) released a statement praising the inclusion of his legislation with Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineTrump meets with potential Supreme Court pick Amy Coney Barrett at White House Names to watch as Trump picks Ginsburg replacement on Supreme Court Barrett seen as a front-runner for Trump Supreme Court pick MORE (D-Va.) to raise the tobacco age to 21 but did not tip his hand on the other provisions. 

“I’m pleased to see bipartisan, bicameral progress continues on solutions to address the teen vaping crisis, primarily through my legislation with Senator Kaine to increase the tobacco purchasing age to 21," McConnell said. “I look forward to reviewing the details on this and the other policies included in the package announced today.”