Sanders, Biden spar over Medicare for All

Sanders, Biden spar over Medicare for All
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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden aspires to become America's auto-pen president Progressive Mondaire Jones wins NY primary to replace Nita Lowey OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden pledges carbon-free power by 2035 in T environment plan | Trump administration has been underestimating costs of carbon pollution, government watchdog finds | Trump to move forward with rollback of bedrock environmental law MORE (I-Vt.) and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden campaign slams Trump's Rose Garden event as 'sad affair' New shutdowns add to Trump woes CNN cuts away from Trump's 'campaign-type' Rose Garden speech MORE sparred over the Vermont senator’s signature "Medicare for All" proposal on Thursday night, highlighting a major rift in the presidential race. 

“I don’t think it is realistic,” Biden said of Sanders’s Medicare for All proposal during the Democratic debate. He pointed to its roughly $30 trillion cost over 10 years, also saying others have said it is closer to $20 trillion, a jab at Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenProgressive Mondaire Jones wins NY primary to replace Nita Lowey Dunford withdraws from consideration to chair coronavirus oversight panel Biden campaign announces second round of staff hires in Arizona MORE (D-Mass.), who also backs the idea, but with a somewhat lower price tag. 

When Sanders raised his hand to signal his desire to interject, Biden responded, “Put your hand down for a second, Bernie, OK?”

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Sanders joked in response, “I’m just waving to you, Joe, saying hello.”

Sanders shot back that Biden’s plan would maintain the “status quo,” to which Biden responded “that’s not true.”

Biden’s plan does in fact call for changes, though they are somewhat smaller than what Sanders proposes. Biden wants to give people the option of a government-run health plan, rather than mandatory government coverage for all as Sanders proposes. 

The Medicare for All debate has been a central divide of the primary, though it has faded somewhat from the earlier debates. The question on health care did not come until about two hours into the debate. 

The sparring also largely avoided Warren. She has drawn scrutiny for putting forward a detailed financing plan for Medicare for All and a transition plan that calls for first passing an optional government health insurance before later pushing to pass full-scale Medicare for All. 

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None of the candidates sought to attack her on those fronts on Thursday. 

Warren noted actions she could take on her own as president, without Congress, such as steps to lower drug prices. Sanders, in contrast, dodged a question on what he would do if Republicans controlled the Senate and he could not pass his plan, instead insisting that he could build pressure for Medicare for All by appealing to the public. 

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Fauci says focus should be on pausing reopenings rather than reverting to shutdowns; WHO director pleads for international unity in pandemic response State election officials warn budget cuts could lead to November chaos Biden strikes populist tone in blistering rebuke of Trump, Wall Street MORE (D-Minn.), who is more of a moderate, told Biden and Sanders “this fight that you guys are having isn’t real,” noting there are moderate Democrats like freshmen House lawmakers from formerly red districts who do not support Medicare for All and would not vote for it. 

She focused on more targeted actions like lowering drug prices. 

The debate also did not focus much on a court ruling on Wednesday that threw the future of the existing Affordable Care Act into doubt. 

President TrumpDonald John TrumpIvanka Trump pitches Goya Foods products on Twitter Sessions defends recusal: 'I leave elected office with my integrity intact' Former White House physician Ronny Jackson wins Texas runoff MORE has backed the lawsuit from conservative state attorneys general seeking to overturn the health law.