Healthcare

More than 21,000 new US COVID-19 cases reported Monday

The U.S. counted more than 21,000 new COVID-19 cases in the country on Monday, more than Sunday though a bit down from the recent average, according to data collected by Johns Hopkins University

About 21,188 cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, were confirmed on Monday, compared to the 20,007 new cases recorded on Sunday. 

Monday’s total is slightly lower than the daily average of new national cases for the past week, which has been approximately 21,294 cases per day.

The daily average of new cases has been increasing over the past week.

The average between May 26 and May 28 amounted to about 19,800 new cases daily, while the average between May 30 and June 1 reached more than 21,700 cases per day. 

Every U.S. state and the District of Columbia have eased their coronavirus restrictions and stay-at-home orders. States had begun reopening in late April, although some, like Texas, Arizona and North Carolina, experienced rising daily increases in confirmed cases in the days following their reopenings.

Health experts have expected a slight boost in new cases with reopenings but are hoping to avoid a dramatic jump. 

In recent days, thousands of protesters, many wearing masks, have taken to the streets in different U.S. cities to demonstrate against George Floyd’s death after being detained by police in Minneapolis.

But experts say the data will not show the impact of the protests on the spread for at least two weeks.

The U.S. has recorded more than 1.8 million cases of coronavirus across the country, leading to at least 105,192 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Monday’s new cases were found in all 50 states, as well as Washington, D.C., and U.S. territories, ABC News reported. The U.S. also recorded 784 new deaths from COVID-19 on Monday. 

Tags Coronavirus COVID-19 George Floyd protests Pandemic reopening

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