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US passes 9 million COVID-19 infections

US passes 9 million COVID-19 infections
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The U.S. passed a total of 9 million coronavirus infections Friday, a grim new milestone that has hit before a winter that is expected to push the total even higher.

The U.S. has had 9,015,262 total confirmed cases since the pandemic began, the highest number of cases out of any country in the world, according to a database maintained by Johns Hopkins University

The new total comes as the nation experiences a third wave that experts warn could be the most serious yet.

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While the first outbreak earlier this year was focused largely in the Northeast and the second outbreak raged across the South and West, states all across the country are seeing spikes in cases this month.

The U.S. on Thursday hit a new record for a single-day increase in confirmed cases with nearly 90,000 new infections. There were more than 88,000 new cases Friday, according to the COVID Tracking Project.

"This is the hardest point in this pandemic right now — the next two months," Scott Gottlieb, the former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, said during an interview on CNBC's "Squawk Box" on Thursday. "We can't give up our guard right now."

Among the worst hit states are crucial political battlegrounds in the Midwest, including Wisconsin, which saw more than 5,000 new cases Friday alone. Polls have shown that the coronavirus is the most important issue to a large swath of voters.

The milestone comes before a winter that experts say will fuel rapid increases in cases as people gather indoors where there is a more conducive environment to spread the virus.

President TrumpDonald TrumpFBI says California extremist may have targeted Newsom House Democrat touts resolution to expel Marjorie Taylor Greene from Congress Facebook to dial back political content on platform MORE has maintained the U.S. is “rounding the corner” with the virus, though that claim has been rebutted by the rising number of cases and hospitalizations.