Study shows nearly 100 percent develop COVID-19 antibodies after second shot

Study shows nearly 100 percent develop COVID-19 antibodies after second shot

A new study from the United Kingdom found that nearly 100 percent of people develop COVID-19 antibodies after receiving their second shot of the AstraZeneca and Pfizer vaccines.

We found that 96.42% of Virus Watch participants were antibody positive 28-34 days after a single dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. This increased to 99.08% 7-14 days after a second vaccine dose,” the study found.

The study comes as the U.K. has been spacing the first and second dose of the coronavirus vaccine further apart in order to get more people vaccinated.

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However, the study found that those in higher-risk groups for the virus didn’t develop as many antibodies after the first shot as those who are not at high risk.

We found evidence that antibody levels were lower with increasing age following the first dose of vaccine. They were also lower in people with some long term health conditions including diabetes, heart disease, cancer and those currently on immunosuppressive therapies,” according to the study.

After a person received a second dose of the AstraZeneca or Pfizer vaccine, there were high antibody levels no matter the health condition.

The study also found the Pfizer vaccine showed higher antibody levels faster than AstraZeneca after the first shot, but four weeks after the first shot both vaccines saw similar antibody rates.

“This is one of the earliest real-world vaccine studies in the UK and it is fantastic news,” Maddie Shrotri, the lead author of the study, told The Guardian. “Over nine out of 10 adults in the UK who had either the Pfizer or AstraZeneca vaccine produced antibodies against the virus within a month of their first shot.”

“How well these vaccines work is remarkable, especially given the speed at which they’ve been developed. It’s a real feat of science in the face of the most devastating pandemic in a century,” Shrotri added.

There were more than 8,500 people from England and Wales involved in the study with more than 13,232 antibody samples.