Dems want GAO probe of new requirements to get Medicaid

Dems want GAO probe of new requirements to get Medicaid
© Greg Nash

Two key Democrats are calling for a federal investigation to find out how much it costs the federal government for states to add eligibility requirements to their Medicaid programs.

In a letter to the comptroller general, Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOn The Money: Inside the Mueller report | Cain undeterred in push for Fed seat | Analysis finds modest boost to economy from new NAFTA | White House says deal will give auto sector B boost Government report says new NAFTA would have minimal impact on economy Hillicon Valley: Washington preps for Mueller report | Barr to hold Thursday presser | Lawmakers dive into AI ethics | FCC chair moves to block China Mobile | Dem bill targets 'digital divide' | Microsoft denies request for facial recognition tech MORE (Ore.) and Rep. Frank Pallone Jr.Frank Joseph PalloneAnti-smoking advocates question industry motives for backing higher purchasing age Overnight Health Care: DOJ charges doctors over illegal opioid prescriptions | Cummings accuses GOP of obstructing drug pricing probe | Sanders courts Republican voters with 'Medicare for All' | Dems probe funding of anti-abortion group House Democrats probe Trump administration's funding of anti-abortion group MORE (N.J.), call for a Government Accountability Office (GAO) investigation of the requirements, which are becoming increasingly common under President TrumpDonald John TrumpRussia's election interference is a problem for the GOP Pence to pitch trade deal during trip to Michigan: report Iran oil minister: US made 'bad mistake' in ending sanctions waivers MORE’s Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

“If CMS continues to approve work requirements and other restrictions on Medicaid, the consequences could be severe for federal spending and the sustainability of the Medicaid program,” write Wyden and Pallone, the ranking members of congressional committees with jurisdiction over Medicaid.

 The lawmakers noted that Kentucky is estimated to need $374 million over the next two years alone— mostly in federal dollars—  “to add work requirements and punitive lockouts to its Medicaid program.”

“The public should have complete information about the consequences of proposed Section 1115 waivers to ensure limited taxpayer dollars are being used efficiently, appropriately, and towards the goal of promoting, not obstructing, access to health care,” Pallone and Wyden wrote.

The Trump administration has been approving waivers for states to impose policies like work requirements, lock-out periods, premiums and cost sharing on Medicaid beneficiaries, a sharp departure from the Obama administration. 

To date, Kentucky, Indiana and Arkansas have been given the green light from the administration for such policies, and more states are awaiting approval.