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Trump misleadingly says prescription drug prices have gone down

President TrumpDonald John TrumpAppeals court OKs White House diverting military funding to border wall construction Pentagon: Tentative meeting between spy agencies, Biden transition set for early next week Conservative policy director calls Section 230 repeal an 'existential threat' for tech MORE on Sunday wrongly claimed drug prices declined in 2018, saying bipartisan cooperation on the issue would “get big results.”

“Last year was the first in 51 years where prescription drug prices actually went down, but things have been, and are being, put in place that will drive them down substantially,” Trump tweeted Sunday. “If Dems would work with us in a bipartisan fashion, we would get big results very fast!”

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In January, Trump tweeted a similar claim, this time saying it was the first time “in nearly half a century” drug prices declined and touting the administration’s efforts to streamline the path to market for generic drugs. Drug price increases in 2018 were smaller and less frequent than in years past, which Health and Human Secretary Alex Azar touted around the same time.

However, a September analysis by the Associated Press found 96 price hikes for each price reduction in the first seven months of 2018, and drug manufacturers increased prices for 1,026 drugs by a median of 6 percent in January, according to STAT News.

Politifact, the fact-checking website, also rated Trump's tweet "mostly false."

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOn The Money: Unemployment gains lower than expected | Jobs report lights fire under coronavirus relief talks Sanders says he can't support bipartisan COVID-19 relief proposal in its current form Progressives push for direct payments to be included in COVID-19 relief deal MORE (I-Vt.) also responded to the claim, noting the correct figures and adding "When we win, we won't wait for drug companies to end their greed. We will end it for them."

The tweet follows comments to reporters by Trump on Friday in which he said the administration would announce a “favored-nations clause” to reduce drug prices, in which the amount the government paid for any given drug would not be more than the lowest amount other nations or companies pay.

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for clarification from The Hill.