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Overnight Healthcare: 46 House Dems vote to repeal ObamaCare tax

The number of Democrats willing to oppose parts of President Obama's healthcare law is growing.

Forty-six House Democrats joined with all House Republicans on Thursday in voting to repeal the law's medical device tax. During the House's last attempt to end the tax in 2012, 37 Democrats voted in favor.

Many of those members represent states where the device industry has a heavy presence, including New York, Massachusetts, Minnesota, California and Pennsylvania.

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The willingness by some Democrats to support changes to the Affordable Care Act represents a shift from the law's early stages. Now, some Democrats have chided Republican leaders in Congress for not taking up what they described as "fixes" to ObamaCare, such as repealing the tax.

The final tally for the bill was 280-140 -- just under the two-thirds majority that would allow the House to override a veto from the president.

The House first voted to repeal the tax in 2012. While the bill does not include a plan to make up for the lost revenue from repealing the tax, supporters believe it stands a chance of clearing both chambers now that the Senate is controlled by Republicans.

Still, it faces an almost certain veto from President Obama because it does not replace $25 billion in funding for ObamaCare over the next decade. Read more here.

BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - Biden to Putin: Tough sanctions, straight talk Boehner on Afghanistan: 'It's time to pull out the troops' Boehner says he voted for Trump, didn't push back on election claims because he's retired MORE SAYS GOP PLAN WOULDN'T SIMPLY EXTEND SUBSIDIES: Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - Biden to Putin: Tough sanctions, straight talk Boehner on Afghanistan: 'It's time to pull out the troops' Boehner says he voted for Trump, didn't push back on election claims because he's retired MORE (R-Ohio) is pushing back against the idea of Republicans simply continuing ObamaCare subsidies if the Supreme Court cripples the law.

At a press conference Thursday, Boehner was asked why a House GOP plan included repeal of the individual mandate, which would just be "veto-bait" for President Obama, and why Republicans would not just extend subsidies through the presidential election while looking for concessions elsewhere in exchange.

"Clearly, we're interested in protecting those millions of Americans who could lose their subsidies. But, as I said, we are not interested in protecting a fundamentally broken law," Boehner said.

Pressed on the point, Boehner responded, "We have an obligation to do what our constituents ask of us.

"And I think our position on ObamaCare has been perfectly clear for years now, and frankly has not changed," he added. "As a matter of fact, I would point out that the more we learn about ObamaCare, the more we learn just how fundamentally broken it really is." Read more here.

'A CONSERVATIVE RESPONSE TO KING V. BURWELL': Rep. Paul GosarPaul Anthony GosarFreedom Caucus member condemns GOP group pushing 'Anglo-Saxon political traditions' Kinzinger: Republicans who join 'America First' caucus should be stripped of committees McCarthy: GOP not the party of 'nativist dog whistles' MORE (R-Ariz.) introduced a bill Thursday that would repeal most parts of ObamaCare – including the healthcare subsidies that could be struck down in court later this month.

Unlike recently unveiled plans from House leadership, Gosar's plan does not include any extension of the subsidies.

That approach was immediately praised by Heritage Action, which has strongly opposed continuing the subsidies because it will "simply cover up the law's costs while giving the impression Republicans believe subsidies are necessary for Americans to afford health insurance."

Gosar is one of the only House conservatives who has ruled out a temporary extension of healthcare subsidies, one day after House leaders briefed the rank-and-file about draft proposals. Read more here.

 

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Please send tips and comments to Sarah Ferris, sferris@thehill.com, and Peter Sullivan, psullivan@thehill.com. Follow on Twitter: @thehill@sarahnferris@PeterSullivan4