Overnight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — House Dems change drug pricing bill to address progressive concerns | Top Republican rejects Dem proposal on surprise medical bills | Vaping group launches Fox News ad blitz

Overnight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — House Dems change drug pricing bill to address progressive concerns | Top Republican rejects Dem proposal on surprise medical bills | Vaping group launches Fox News ad blitz
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Welcome to Overnight Health Care.

House Democrats are charging ahead with markups on their signature drug pricing bill, but not without some changes first.  A new study purports to show how much a single payer health system will really cost, and the chairman of the Ways and Means Committee is getting pushback on his plan to solve surprise medical billing. 

We'll start with drug pricing: 

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House Democrats change drug pricing bill in bid to address progressive concerns

Get ready for a long day of drug pricing markups tomorrow...

Ahead of the markups in the House Energy and Commerce and House Education and Labor committees, Democratic leaders made some changes to the bill, shifting it slightly to the left in an effort to address progressive concerns.  

The main changes: 

  • Increase minimum number of drugs to be negotiated from 25 to 35 drugs. 
  • Require negotiation on some newly launched drugs if their prices are more than the median U.S. household income. 

Big picture: The measure is expected to pass the House later this month or early next month, though there are still concerns from some lawmakers on both the progressive side and centrist side. But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellLawmakers outline proposals for virtual voting Overnight Health Care: Trump calls report on hospital shortages 'another fake dossier' | Trump weighs freezing funding to WHO | NY sees another 731 deaths | States battle for supplies | McConnell, Schumer headed for clash Phase-four virus relief hits a wall MORE (R-Ky.) has vowed to kill the bill in the Senate, calling it "socialist."

Splits among progressives: Not all progressives reacted in the same way to the changes. 

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Rep. Jan SchakowskyJanice (Jan) Danoff SchakowskyHouse Democrats call on Trump administration to lift restrictions on fetal tissue for coronavirus research The Memo: Virus crisis upends political world Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers seek 5G rivals to Huawei | Amazon, eBay grilled over online counterfeits | Judge tosses Gabbard lawsuit against Google | GOP senator introduces bill banning TikTok on government devices MORE (D-Ill.), a member of the progressive caucus and an ally of Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiLawmakers outline proposals for virtual voting Mattis defends Pentagon IG removed by Trump Overnight Health Care: Trump calls report on hospital shortages 'another fake dossier' | Trump weighs freezing funding to WHO | NY sees another 731 deaths | States battle for supplies | McConnell, Schumer headed for clash MORE (D-Calif.), appeared to be won over by the changes, as she released a statement endorsing the bill on Tuesday night.

But Rep. Lloyd DoggettLloyd Alton DoggettTexas House Dems ask governor to issue stay-at-home order Texas lawmakers call for investigation into CDC's handling of released coronavirus patient in San Antonio Ocasio-Cortez knocks Pence: 'Utterly irresponsible to put him in charge of US coronavirus response' MORE (D-Texas), who has been one of the most outspoken in pushing the bill in a more progressive direction, is not satisfied. 

"Congressman Doggett is still vigorously pursuing substantial improvements to strengthen the bill," a Doggett spokesperson said.

Read more here

 

 

Top Republican rejects Dem chairman's approach to stopping surprise medical bills

The effort to protect patients from surprise medical bills is not exactly smooth sailing right now.

The latest twist: Rep. Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradyOfficials sound alarm over virus relief check scams Mnuchin says Social Security recipients will automatically get coronavirus checks Pelosi not invited by Trump to White House coronavirus relief bill's signing MORE (R-Texas), the top Ways and Means Republican, rejected a proposal from Chairman Richard NealRichard Edmund NealPressure mounts on Congress for quick action with next coronavirus bill Democrats urge administration to automatically issue coronavirus checks to more people One year in, Democrats frustrated by fight for Trump tax returns MORE (D-Mass.). 

"I think we ought to go back to the drawing board rather than pursue that," Brady told reporters. 

Neal proposed late last month to essentially punt the problem to a committee of stakeholder groups and administrative agencies to come up with a solution. That proposal drew criticism even from some Democrats as not addressing the problem directly, but Neal said at the time that he was "optimistic" Brady would support it. 

Now, Brady is rejecting Neal's idea. 

What now? The surprise billing effort seems stalled. While all sides say they agree the problem should be addressed, there are a range of rival proposals on how and no clear path forward at the moment. 

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Read more here

 

Vaping industry group launches Fox News ad campaign 

The Vapor Technology Association is launching an advertising blitz to try and convince President TrumpDonald John TrumpCDC updates website to remove dosage guidance on drug touted by Trump Trump says he'd like economy to reopen 'with a big bang' but acknowledges it may be limited Graham backs Trump, vows no money for WHO in next funding bill MORE not to move ahead with his proposal to ban flavored e-cigarettes. 

The organization is placing a one-week, six-figure buy that covers Fox News programming throughout the day, including Fox & Friends, which the president has been known to watch and tweet about.

Last month, President Trump announced from the Oval Office that he was instituting a total ban on all e-cigarette flavors except tobacco until the companies can clear the Food and Drug Administration's strict regulatory requirements. 

However, the ads don't fault Trump at all. Instead, they praise Trump for keeping his promises on making sure government agencies follow the law, and blame nameless "bureaucrats" for the proposal.

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"Despite President Trump's efforts, bureaucrats are considering a huge new overreach: they're considering banning flavored vapor," the narrator says in the 30-second ad. "Vaping is at least 95 percent safer than smoking. But if the government bans flavored vapor, 150,000 jobs -- gone. Millions will resort to cigarettes or the black market."

The ads, which will also run online, are expected to begin Thursday. 

 

New study: Full-scale 'Medicare for All' costs $32 trillion over 10 years

After a fierce Democratic debate on health care on Tuesday night, there's some new numbers on the issue. 

From the Urban Institute:

  • Full scale Medicare for All costs $32.01 trillion over 10 years, saves households $886 billion and covers 32 million more people. 
  • A public option available to all would cost $1.3 trillion over 10 years.  Uninsured would fall from 32.2 million to 6.6 million people. All of the remaining uninsured would be people in the country illegally. 

Politics: The full-scale plan is close to what Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenHillicon Valley: Schiff presses intel chief on staff changes | Warren offers plan to secure elections | Twitter's Jack Dorsey to donate B to coronavirus fight | WhatsApp takes steps to counter virus misinformation Warren releases plan to secure elections during coronavirus pandemic On The Money: Trump officials struggle to get relief loans out the door | Dow soars more than 1600 points | Kudlow says officials 'looking at' offering coronavirus bonds MORE (D-Mass.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersDrugmaker caps insulin costs at to help diabetes patients during pandemic The Hill's Campaign Report: Wisconsin votes despite coronavirus pandemic Sen. Brown endorses Biden for president MORE (I-Vt.) are proposing, while the public option is close to Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegButtigieg launches new PAC to aid down-ballot candidates HuffPost political reporter on why Bernie fell way behind Biden Economists fear slow pace of testing will prolong recession MORE and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump shakes up WH communications team The Hill's Campaign Report: Wisconsin votes despite coronavirus pandemic The Intercept's Ryan Grim says Cuomo is winning over critics MORE.

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Whether to go full scale, with higher government costs, is a central aspect of the debate. 

Read more here

 

 

What we're reading

J&J offers $4 billion opioid litigation settlement (Wall Street Journal)

High-profile trial over who should pay for the opioid crisis begins (Washington Post)

Book: Trump mulled order to close parts of VA health system (Associated Press

 

State by state

Oklahoma judge says he miscalculated award by $107 million in opioid case (Associated Press)

Surprise settlement in Sutter Health antitrust case (Kaiser Health News)

California to provide financial boost to help buy health coverage (California Healthline

 

From The Hill's opinion page: 

Applause for Sesame Street -- it shows children that addiction is a disease and not a moral failing