Congress to Ukraine: US can’t get it done

Congress to Ukraine: US can’t get it done
© Getty Images

Congress will fail to approve an aid package to Ukraine before a Sunday referendum in Crimea, where voters will decide whether to break away from Kiev’s government to join Vladimir Putin’s Russia.

While a Senate panel on Wednesday approved legislation in a bipartisan vote, aides said differences between the House and Senate will prevent Congress from completing its work before lawmakers leave Washington on Friday for a weeklong recess.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Only the U.S. Senate could bungle this like it has,” Sen. Jim RischJames Elroy RischRepublicans say Mayorkas failed to deliver report on evacuated Afghans Ukraine president, US lawmakers huddle amid tensions with Russia Senate approves sweeping defense bill MORE (R-Idaho) remarked after the vote.

President Obama at the beginning of last week said Congress should move $1 billion in loan guarantees for Ukraine as its first course of business, and he reiterated the call on Wednesday while hosting Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk at the White House.

“I would just ask both Democrats and Republicans, who I know are unified in their support of Ukraine, to move quickly to give us the support that we need so that we can give the Ukrainian people the support that they need,” Obama said. 

Yet the administration also backed the inclusion of reforms to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in the Ukraine bill that slowed Congress’s work. The reforms are not included in the House bill, and are opposed by conservative lawmakers in both chambers.

An administration official on Thursday downplayed the congressional delay.

"Given our ongoing background work and preparation, a one to two week delay in the approval of the loan guarantee by Congress would not have a meaningful impact on timing on which the Ukraine guarantees would be done," the official said. 

Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerDemocrats eager to fill power vacuum after Pelosi exit Stopping the next insurrection Biden, lawmakers mourn Harry Reid MORE (R-Ohio) on Wednesday urged the Senate to simply pass a bill granting $1 billion in loan guarantees to Ukraine, which the House passed last week. 

Heather Conley, an expert from the Center for Strategic and International Studies, said failing to pass the bill this week would be harmful.

“It sends a clear and damaging message to our allies and enemies alike that U.S. political polarization trumps American leadership and credibility abroad,” she said. “It is unfortunate particularly when acting Prime Minister Yatsenyuk met with Members of Congress today.”

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee approved legislation including the IMF language in a 14-3 vote, with four Republicans joining the panel’s Democrats in voting “aye.”

But Risch and two other Republicans rejected the bill in large part over that issue, and it was expected to ruin any chance of quickly moving the legislation through the Senate floor.

“Everybody wants to see this done ... why would you strap in a poison pill?” Risch said Wednesday. “I think it is a forgone conclusion this is not going to get through the House.”

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Robert MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezDems block Cruz's Nord Stream 2 sanctions bill Overnight Defense & National Security — Differences remain between NATO, Russia Senate Democrats unveil bill sanctioning Russia over Ukraine MORE (D-N.J.) downplayed the opposition.

He argued the bipartisan committee vote sent a strong signal and strengthens Secretary of State John KerryJohn KerryA presidential candidate pledge can right the wrongs of an infamous day Equilibrium/Sustainability — Dam failures cap a year of disasters Four environmental fights to watch in 2022 MORE’s hand as he tries to negotiate an end to the Ukraine crisis on Friday with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov.

“It’s probably the first order of business when we return,” he said. “Many of my Republican colleagues have talked to me about their willingness to vote for it on the floor.”

Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainKelly takes under-the-radar approach in Arizona Senate race Voting rights, Trump's Big Lie, and Republicans' problem with minorities Sinema, Manchin curb Biden's agenda MORE (R-Ariz.), who backed the bill, also argued the committee vote would strengthen Kerry.

“I am confident we will have more than enough votes to pass it when we get back,” McCain said. 

Besides McCain, Sens. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerRepublicans, ideology, and demise of the state and local tax deduction Cheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP How leaving Afghanistan cancels our post-9/11 use of force MORE (R-Tenn.), Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeCruz to get Nord Stream 2 vote as part of deal on Biden nominees Democrats threaten to play hardball over Cruz's blockade Rubio vows to slow-walk Biden's China, Spain ambassador nominees MORE (R-Ariz.) and Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonSen. Ron Johnson: Straight from the horse's mouth Senate Democrats' super PAC releases million ad buy against Ron Johnson Barnes rakes in almost 0K after Johnson enters Wisconsin Senate race MORE (R-Wis.) supported the bill.

Risch and Sens. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoMcConnell will run for another term as leader despite Trump's attacks Senate Minority Whip Thune, close McConnell ally, to run for reelection Biden's court picks face fierce GOP opposition MORE (R-Wyo.) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulRand Paul cancels DirecTV subscription after it drops OAN Trump slams Biden, voices unsubstantiated election fraud claims at first rally of 2022 Overnight Energy & Environment — Lummis holds up Biden EPA picks MORE (R-Ky.) opposed the bill. Barrasso and Paul disliked both the IMF provisions and granting loan guarantees to Ukraine, which Paul argued would end up being paid to Russia because of Kiev’s gas debt to Moscow.

The IMF reforms would give more voting rights at the body to several advanced developing countries — including Russia, a point made by the provision’s opponents.

“This legislation is supposed to be about assisting Ukraine and punishing Russia, and the IMF measure completely undercuts both of these goals by giving Putin’s Russia something it wants,” said Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Djokovic may not compete in French Open over vaccine requirement Florida looms large in Republican 2024 primary How a nice-guy South Dakota senator fell into a Trump storm MORE (R-Fla.), who missed the vote because he was in Florida for jury duty.

Corker argued that the share increase for Russia is small, going from a 2.5 percent to 2.7 percent stake, and that the reforms would strengthen U.S. leadership.

Another possible problem in the House is opposition to cuts to Army and Air Force procurement programs that are used to pay for a portion of the bill’s $315 million cost.

House Armed Services Committee Chairman Buck McKeon (R-Calif.) objected to those cuts, and described the bill as “loony.”

The bill includes $157 million in cuts to defense procurement. 

The impasse in Congress is taking place just before Kerry plans to travel to London on Friday to try to convince Lavrov to “diffuse” the Crimea crisis.

In testimony to a congressional panel on Wednesday, he warned the administration was ready to act on sanctions if Russia does not bend.

“We will do what we have to do if Russia cannot find the way to make the right choices here,” Kerry said. “It can get ugly fast if the wrong choices are made.”

The bill approved by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee would authorize Obama to freeze assets and deny visas to individuals in Russia and Ukraine involved in backing Russia’s intervention, corruption or anti-Democratic efforts in Ukraine.

Jeremy Herb and Justin Sink contributed.