Netanyahu urges Senate to keep pressure on Iran

ADVERTISEMENT

Graham said there's consensus in the Senate to move ahead with a new round of sanctions, which the Senate Banking Committee is expected to take up shortly. The House passed similar legislation by an overwhelming bipartisan majority in July.

“He just said basically that he believes in the importance that there be cost if Iran continues its nuclear program,” said Sen. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinIt's time for Congress to guarantee Medigap Health Insurance for vulnerable Americans with kidney disease Senators call for Smithsonian Latino, women's museums to be built on National Mall Democrats plow ahead as Manchin yo-yos MORE (D-Md.). “What we're doing now he strongly thanked us for and said it's having an impact and making it possible for us to negotiate.”

Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerCheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP How leaving Afghanistan cancels our post-9/11 use of force The unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  MORE (R-Tenn.) the top Republican on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said Netanyahu gave “very detailed” answers about his views.

“Like all of us, I don't think he wants the negotiations to go on forever,” Corker said. “Obviously letting up on the sanctions is not something any us are interested in. And like all of us, he understands that if there is an agreement it needs to be a full agreement.”

He wouldn't say if Netanyahu pressed the committee for more sanctions.

“I'm not going to answer that,” he said.

The meeting was organized by the committee. A handful of other members showed up – Senate hawks Graham and Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteSununu setback leaves GOP scrambling in New Hampshire The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - GOP dealt 2022 blow, stares down Trump-era troubles Sununu exit underscores uncertain GOP path to gain Senate majority MORE (R-N.H.) as well as Chuck SchumerChuck SchumerSchumer mourns death of 'amazing' father Feehery: The honest contrarian Biden administration to release oil from strategic reserve: reports MORE (D-N.Y.), the Number three Democrat in the Senate. Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidVoters need to feel the benefit, not just hear the message Schumer-McConnell dial down the debt ceiling drama Mellman: Are independents really so independent? MORE (D-Nev.) made a brief appearance but left before the arrival of Netanyahu, who was running late.

Netanyahu spent four hours meeting with President Obama and Vice-President Biden at the White House earlier in the day before sitting down with Secretary of State John KerryJohn KerryEquilibrium/Sustainability — Presented by Southern Company — Storms a growing danger for East Coast Israel, Jordan, UAE sign pivotal deal to swap solar energy, desalinated water GOP seeks oversight hearing with Kerry on climate diplomacy  MORE at the State Department. The Israeli leader is concerned that Rouhani's calls for talks are a stalling tactic as Iran continues to move forward with its alleged nuclear weapons program.

After he left, the committee quickly voted to approve Caroline Kennedy as the new ambassador to Japan and to reauthorize the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), portions of which expire at the end of the day Monday.  

Please send tips and comments to Julian Pecquet: jpecquet@thehill.com

Follow us on Twitter: @TheHillGlobal and @JPecquetTheHill