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Egyptian lawmaker: New York Times at ‘war with Egypt'

Egyptian lawmaker: New York Times at ‘war with Egypt'
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An Egyptian lawmaker declared on Wednesday that The New York Time is "at war with Egypt," as the country's prosecutor general ordered a criminal investigation into a leak published by the newspaper. 

According to the Times, the lawmaker, Mostafa el-Gendy, accused the newspaper of trying to "bring down the nation, not just the state or the president."

The comments came as Egypt's top prosecutor, Nabil Sadek, ordered an investigation into a Jan. 6 article in the Times quoting an Egyptian intelligence officer instructing talk show hosts in the country to persuade viewers to accept the U.S. decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital.

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According to Egypt's al-Ahram newspaper, Sadek said that the Times's report "undermines Egypt's security and public peace, and harms the country's public interest."

The Egyptian government officially supports a future Palestinian state along the borders preceding the 1967 Six-Day War, as well as the establishment of east Jerusalem as the future state's capital. 

President TrumpDonald John TrumpHillary Clinton responds to Chrissy Teigen tweet: 'I love you back' Police called after Florida moms refuse to wear face masks at school board meeting about mask policy Supreme Court rejects Trump effort to shorten North Carolina mail-ballot deadline MORE's decision last month to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel prompted international backlash, with Arab and Muslim leaders condemning the move as a threat to stability in the region. 

The United Nations General Assembly voted last month to rebuke the Trump administration's move and urge the U.S. to reverse the decision. 

New York Times international editor Michael Slackman defended the newspaper's reporting, rejecting the notion that it sought to advance any sort of agenda.

“Our story was a deeply reported, consequential piece of journalism, and we stand fully behind it,” Slackman said, according to the Times.

“We disclosed in the original report that the audio recordings were provided to The Times by an intermediary supportive of the Palestinian cause, but we had no agenda other than giving our readers the facts they needed to know.”