Top GOP donor sought $75M fee if DOJ ended probe into Malaysian scandal: report

Top GOP donor sought $75M fee if DOJ ended probe into Malaysian scandal: report
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A longtime Republican donor allegedly sought to make tens of millions of dollars if the Department of Justice (DOJ) dropped its investigation into an investment deal connected to the Malaysian prime minster.

Elliott Broidy and his wife, attorney Robin Rosenzweig, reportedly discussed in emails over the past year arranging a consulting contract with Jho Low, the businessman at the center of an investment scandal that ensnared Malaysian leader Najib Razak. 

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One email includes a proposal for a $75 million fee for the couple if the Justice Department dropped its investigation into the scandal, The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday.

Other emails allegedly show Broidy prepared talking points for Razak before the latter's 2017 visit to Washington, D.C., according to documents. The prime minister was advised to emphasize Malaysia's assistance in confronting North Korea.

The emails do not show if any consulting deal with Low was finalized.

Broidy was a vice chairman of President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump rips Dems' demands, impeachment talk: 'Witch Hunt continues!' Nevada Senate passes bill that would give Electoral College votes to winner of national popular vote The Hill's Morning Report - Pelosi remains firm despite new impeachment push MORE's joint campaign fund with the Republican Party.

A lawyer sent the Journal a statement of behalf of Broidy and Rosenzweig, saying the couple was asked to provide advice to Low “as part of a broader team.”

“At no time did Mr. Broidy or Ms. Rosenzweig, or anyone acting on their behalf, discuss Mr. Low’s case with President Trump, any member of his staff, or anyone at the U.S. Department of Justice,” the lawyer said.

The Justice Department has been investigating officials at 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB) over allegations of laundering money through the U.S.

DOJ said $4.5 billion belonging to a sovereign wealth fund was stolen by high level officials at the fund, including Low. Some of the money allegedly benefitted the prime minister, who oversaw the company.

Both Low and Razak have denied any wrongdoing in the scandal.

Neither Low nor DOJ would offer comment on the matter to the Journal.