Warren slams ‘chaotic foreign policy’ while in Asia

Warren slams ‘chaotic foreign policy’ while in Asia
© Greg Nash

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenThe Hill's Morning Report — Mueller aftermath: What will House Dems do now? Warren spends big on staff in high-stakes 2020 gamble On The Money: Inside the Mueller report | Cain undeterred in push for Fed seat | Analysis finds modest boost to economy from new NAFTA | White House says deal will give auto sector B boost MORE (D-Mass.) criticized the Trump administration for its “chaotic foreign policy” and said Washington's policies toward China have been “misdirected” for decades.

Warren said during a visit to the region that President TrumpDonald John TrumpGrassroots America shows the people support Donald Trump Trump speaks to rebel Libyan general attacking Tripoli Dem lawmaker: Mueller report shows 'substantial body of evidence' on obstruction MORE is hurting the U.S.'s ability to create an effective foreign policy toward North Korea’s nuclear program and other vital issues in Asia, The Associated Press reported.

“This has been a chaotic foreign policy in the region, and that makes it hard to keep the allies that we need to accomplish our objectives closely stitched-in,” Warren told reporters in Beijing on Saturday.

ADVERTISEMENT

The senator, whom many consider a possible 2020 presidential candidate, also visited South Korea and Japan, where she criticized Trump for his “rash” agreement to meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

For the summit between Trump and Kim to be a success, Warren said, there would need to be a commitment to discuss steps to reduce North Korea’s nuclear threat, Reuters reported. That would require negotiations by the State Department Trump has weakened, she said.

Warren, 68, argued that vacancies in the foreign service are getting in the way of the country’s ability to pursue its interests.

Warren also said that the foreign policy the U.S. has pursued with China for decades is flawed.

She said that the U.S. has mistakenly assumed for years that economic engagement with China would lead to a more open China. Now, she argued, the U.S. is finally understanding Chinese demands for U.S. companies to provide their intellectual property in exchange for access to its market.

“Now U.S. policymakers are starting to look more aggressively at pushing China to open up the markets without demanding a hostage price of access to U.S. technology,” she said.

Warren told Chinese officials that the U.S. can't support more economic integration with China if China fails to recognize basic human rights.

“I understand that our relationship with China is complex. There are areas where we have mutual interests and where we will work together to try to accomplish our shared goals,” Warren said. “But there are also areas where we are vigorous competitors and do not have shared interests.”