May delays UK Brexit vote

British Prime Minister Theresa May on Monday announced that she will delay a Brexit vote that she had negotiated with the European Union (EU), which was originally set for Tuesday. 

"We've now had three days of debate on the withdrawal agreement, setting out the terms of our departure from the EU and the political decoration setting out our future relationship after we have left," May said while speaking before Parliament.

ADVERTISEMENT

"I've listened very carefully to what has been said in this chamber and out of it—" she began, before being interrupted by raucous laughter. "To what has been said in this chamber and out of it from members of all sides."

"From listening to those views, it is clear that while there is broad support for many of the key aspects of the view—" she continued, before being again interrupted by laughing and shouting. "On one issue, the Northern Ireland backstop, there reminds widespread and deep concern."

"As a result if we went ahead and held the vote tomorrow the deal would be rejected by a significant margin," she said. "We will, therefore, defer the vote scheduled for tomorrow and not proceed to divide the House at this time."

There have been a number of European diplomats who say they do not back any proposal that might include a hard border between Ireland and Northern Ireland. 

May's deal with the EU has met significant criticism, particularly from conservatives in and outside the U.K.

Nigel Farage, who was a strong advocate for Brexit, called May's agreement "the worst deal in history."

President TrumpDonald John TrumpWarren: 'White supremacists pose a threat to the United States like any other terrorist group' National Enquirer paid 0,000 for Bezos texts: report Santorum: Trump should 'send emails to a therapist' instead of tweeting MORE, who has been an outspoken proponent of Brexit, cautioned that the deal May had secured might block the U.K. from fashioning its own trade deals with America.

May's office has brushed off Trump's comments, citing "positive and productive" discussions with the White House.

However, only three months remain until the U.K. is set to leave the EU and significant diplomatic work went into May's agreement, making officials reluctant to reopening talks with the EU.