Susan Rice: Trump doing more to undermine national security than any foreign adversary

Former national security adviser Susan Rice has penned a highly critical op-ed tearing into President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrumps light 97th annual National Christmas Tree Trump to hold campaign rally in Michigan 'Don't mess with Mama': Pelosi's daughter tweets support following press conference comments MORE over foreign policy.

The piece, “The Threat in the White House,” was published Sunday in The New York Times and details what she calls “dangerous dysfunction” in the Trump administration.

In the op-ed, Rice wrote that the U.S.’s national security decisionmaking process is “more broken” than at any time since 1947, when the National Security Act become law.

She said the president “does more to undermine American national security than any foreign adversary.”

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Rice, who worked under former President Obama, pointed specifically to Trump’s decision to withdraw U.S. troops from Syria, a move she called “reckless.”

Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisThreatening foreign states with sanctions can backfire Overnight Defense: Erdoğan gets earful from GOP senators | Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract decision in court | Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families Amazon to challenge Pentagon's 'war cloud' decision in federal court MORE submitted his resignation the day after Trump’s Syria move. Rice warned that Trump’s decision is a blow to U.S. allies in the region.

“If our national security decision-making process were even minimally functional, there would have been a carefully devised plan to execute moves, including wrongheaded ones,” she writes.

Trump tweeted on Sunday that the withdraw from Syria will be "slow & highly coordinated."

Rice in the op-ed went on to accuse Trump’s national security adviser, John Bolton, of cutting out key Defense officials from major decisions and leaving “crucial positions” vacant.

Rice said Trump “has dealt the death blow to effective policymaking.”

“The president couldn’t care less about facts, intelligence, military analysis or the national interest,” she wrote. “He refuses to take seriously the views of his advisers, announces decisions on impulse and disregards the consequences of his actions.”