Trump: Russia says it has removed 'most of their people' from Venezuela

Trump: Russia says it has removed 'most of their people' from Venezuela
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpFacebook releases audit on conservative bias claims Harry Reid: 'Decriminalizing border crossings is not something that should be at the top of the list' Recessions happen when presidents overlook key problems MORE said Monday that Russia informed the U.S. that it had removed "most of their people from Venezuela," a point of concern amid the ongoing unrest there.

Trump tweeted about the drawdown in Russian involvement in Venezuela while in London on a state visit. 

The president did not elaborate on the alleged decrease in Russian personnel. The White House National Security Council declined to comment.

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The Wall Street Journal reported Sunday night that Russia had withdrawn from the South American country key defense advisers who had been supporting embattled President Nicolás Maduro.

The Journal reported that Russian defense contractor Rostec cut its staff from about 1,000 to just a few dozen advisers. The personnel had been training Venezuelan troops.

Trump had previously called for Russia to "get out" of Venezuela, but said following a phone call with Russian President Vladimir PutinVladimir Vladimirovich PutinThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump on defense over economic jitters Can we do business with Kim Jong Un? Leadership analysis might give clues Russian defense minister: 'We won't do anything' in Europe unless US places missiles there MORE last month said the Russian leader was "not looking at all to get involved in Venezuela."

The remarks appeared to contradict national security adviser John BoltonJohn Robert BoltonSchumer joins Pelosi in opposition to post-Brexit trade deal that risks Northern Ireland accord Why President Trump must keep speaking out on Hong Kong Trump meets with national security team on Afghanistan peace plan MORE and Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoCotton warns China: Crackdown on Hong Kong would be 'grave miscalculation' Pompeo expresses concern over North Korea missile tests Pompeo acknowledges 'places where ISIS is more powerful today' MORE, who have repeatedly blamed Russia and Cuba for propping up Maduro's government.

The U.S., along with multiple other nations, has recognized General Assembly leader Juan Guaidó as Venezuela's legitimate president and placed numerous sanctions on Maduro and his allies.

The White House downplayed Trump's comments about his conversation with Putin, saying the president was merely relaying the Russian leader's message.

Updated at 3:41 p.m.