Trump: Russia says it has removed 'most of their people' from Venezuela

Trump: Russia says it has removed 'most of their people' from Venezuela
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpWatergate prosecutor says that Sondland testimony was 'tipping point' for Trump In private moment with Trump, Justice Kennedy pushed for Kavanaugh Supreme Court nomination: book Obama: 'Everybody needs to chill out' about differences between 2020 candidates MORE said Monday that Russia informed the U.S. that it had removed "most of their people from Venezuela," a point of concern amid the ongoing unrest there.

Trump tweeted about the drawdown in Russian involvement in Venezuela while in London on a state visit. 

The president did not elaborate on the alleged decrease in Russian personnel. The White House National Security Council declined to comment.

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The Wall Street Journal reported Sunday night that Russia had withdrawn from the South American country key defense advisers who had been supporting embattled President Nicolás Maduro.

The Journal reported that Russian defense contractor Rostec cut its staff from about 1,000 to just a few dozen advisers. The personnel had been training Venezuelan troops.

Trump had previously called for Russia to "get out" of Venezuela, but said following a phone call with Russian President Vladimir PutinVladimir Vladimirovich PutinPutin: 'Thank God' election interference accusations have stopped amid US 'political battles' Live coverage: Impeachment spotlight shifts to Fiona Hill, David Holmes As Buttigieg rises, Biden is still the target MORE last month said the Russian leader was "not looking at all to get involved in Venezuela."

The remarks appeared to contradict national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonHill, Holmes offer damaging impeachment testimony: Five takeaways The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Johnson & Johnson — Witness dismisses 'fictional' GOP claims of Ukraine meddling Hill says Bolton suggested Giuliani's actions would 'come back to haunt us' MORE and Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoOvernight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Deal on defense bill proves elusive | Hill, Holmes offer damaging testimony | Trump vows to block Navy from ousting officer from SEALs Hill, Holmes offer damaging impeachment testimony: Five takeaways Graham requests State Department documents on Bidens, Ukraine MORE, who have repeatedly blamed Russia and Cuba for propping up Maduro's government.

The U.S., along with multiple other nations, has recognized General Assembly leader Juan Guaidó as Venezuela's legitimate president and placed numerous sanctions on Maduro and his allies.

The White House downplayed Trump's comments about his conversation with Putin, saying the president was merely relaying the Russian leader's message.

Updated at 3:41 p.m.