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Trump: Russia says it has removed 'most of their people' from Venezuela

Trump: Russia says it has removed 'most of their people' from Venezuela
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden to nominate Linda Thomas-Greenfield for UN ambassador: reports Scranton dedicates 'Joe Biden Way' to honor president-elect Kasich: Republicans 'either in complete lockstep' or 'afraid' of Trump MORE said Monday that Russia informed the U.S. that it had removed "most of their people from Venezuela," a point of concern amid the ongoing unrest there.

Trump tweeted about the drawdown in Russian involvement in Venezuela while in London on a state visit. 

The president did not elaborate on the alleged decrease in Russian personnel. The White House National Security Council declined to comment.

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The Wall Street Journal reported Sunday night that Russia had withdrawn from the South American country key defense advisers who had been supporting embattled President Nicolás Maduro.

The Journal reported that Russian defense contractor Rostec cut its staff from about 1,000 to just a few dozen advisers. The personnel had been training Venezuelan troops.

Trump had previously called for Russia to "get out" of Venezuela, but said following a phone call with Russian President Vladimir PutinVladimir Vladimirovich PutinPutin not ready to recognize Biden win Putin: Russia ready to give Sputnik V coronavirus vaccine to other countries Trump to participate in virtual G-20 summit amid coronavirus surge MORE last month said the Russian leader was "not looking at all to get involved in Venezuela."

The remarks appeared to contradict national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonPressure grows from GOP for Trump to recognize Biden election win Sunday shows - Virus surge dominates ahead of fraught Thanksgiving holiday Bolton calls on GOP leadership to label Trump's behavior 'inexcusable' MORE and Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoPompeo says Mideast strategy will be Trump administration policy 'until our time is complete' Trump administration pulls out of Open Skies treaty with Russia Tibetan political leader makes visit to White House for first time in six decades MORE, who have repeatedly blamed Russia and Cuba for propping up Maduro's government.

The U.S., along with multiple other nations, has recognized General Assembly leader Juan Guaidó as Venezuela's legitimate president and placed numerous sanctions on Maduro and his allies.

The White House downplayed Trump's comments about his conversation with Putin, saying the president was merely relaying the Russian leader's message.

Updated at 3:41 p.m.