Trump: Russia says it has removed 'most of their people' from Venezuela

Trump: Russia says it has removed 'most of their people' from Venezuela
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpSchiff pleads to Senate GOP: 'Right matters. And the truth matters.' Anita Hill to Iowa crowd: 'Statute of limitations' for Biden apology is 'up' Sen. Van Hollen releases documents from GAO investigation MORE said Monday that Russia informed the U.S. that it had removed "most of their people from Venezuela," a point of concern amid the ongoing unrest there.

Trump tweeted about the drawdown in Russian involvement in Venezuela while in London on a state visit. 

The president did not elaborate on the alleged decrease in Russian personnel. The White House National Security Council declined to comment.

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The Wall Street Journal reported Sunday night that Russia had withdrawn from the South American country key defense advisers who had been supporting embattled President Nicolás Maduro.

The Journal reported that Russian defense contractor Rostec cut its staff from about 1,000 to just a few dozen advisers. The personnel had been training Venezuelan troops.

Trump had previously called for Russia to "get out" of Venezuela, but said following a phone call with Russian President Vladimir PutinVladimir Vladimirovich PutinThe need for clear thinking about Russia German president expresses 'sorrow' for Holocaust, warns 'spirits of evil' are rising A new era in Russia will allow America to rethink its policy MORE last month said the Russian leader was "not looking at all to get involved in Venezuela."

The remarks appeared to contradict national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonSenate Republicans confident they'll win fight on witnesses Hakeem Jeffries tells Senate in impeachment proceedings they should subpoena Baseball Hall of Fame after Jeter vote Susan Collins asked Justice Roberts to intervene after Nadler late-night 'cover-up' accusation MORE and Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoThe Hill's Morning Report - House prosecutes Trump as 'lawless,' 'corrupt' Overnight Defense: Trump downplays troops' concussion injuries in Iran attack | Dems offer case against Trump on day two of trial | UN links Saudis to hack of Bezos' phone Pompeo willing to testify in impeachment trial if 'legally required' MORE, who have repeatedly blamed Russia and Cuba for propping up Maduro's government.

The U.S., along with multiple other nations, has recognized General Assembly leader Juan Guaidó as Venezuela's legitimate president and placed numerous sanctions on Maduro and his allies.

The White House downplayed Trump's comments about his conversation with Putin, saying the president was merely relaying the Russian leader's message.

Updated at 3:41 p.m.