Trump: Russia says it has removed 'most of their people' from Venezuela

Trump: Russia says it has removed 'most of their people' from Venezuela
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpDeSantis on Florida schools reopening: 'If you can do Walmart,' then 'we absolutely can do schools' NYT editorial board calls for the reopening of schools with help from federal government's 'checkbook' Mueller pens WaPo op-ed: Roger Stone 'remains a convicted felon, and rightly so' MORE said Monday that Russia informed the U.S. that it had removed "most of their people from Venezuela," a point of concern amid the ongoing unrest there.

Trump tweeted about the drawdown in Russian involvement in Venezuela while in London on a state visit. 

The president did not elaborate on the alleged decrease in Russian personnel. The White House National Security Council declined to comment.

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The Wall Street Journal reported Sunday night that Russia had withdrawn from the South American country key defense advisers who had been supporting embattled President Nicolás Maduro.

The Journal reported that Russian defense contractor Rostec cut its staff from about 1,000 to just a few dozen advisers. The personnel had been training Venezuelan troops.

Trump had previously called for Russia to "get out" of Venezuela, but said following a phone call with Russian President Vladimir PutinVladimir Vladimirovich PutinTrump calls for 'sick' author of 2016 dossier to be jailed Trump, Johnson and Netanyahu: Western nationalism's embattled icons Lincoln Project offers list of GOP senators who 'protect' Trump in new ad MORE last month said the Russian leader was "not looking at all to get involved in Venezuela."

The remarks appeared to contradict national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonTrump envoy says US ready to talk to North Korea but rebukes Pyongyang counterpart Why Trump can't make up his mind on China The benefits of American disinterest in world affairs MORE and Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoHillicon Valley: Facebook considers political ad ban | Senators raise concerns over civil rights audit | Amazon reverses on telling workers to delete TikTok Amazon backtracks, says email asking employees to delete TikTok was sent in error Amazon asks employees to delete TikTok from mobile devices: report MORE, who have repeatedly blamed Russia and Cuba for propping up Maduro's government.

The U.S., along with multiple other nations, has recognized General Assembly leader Juan Guaidó as Venezuela's legitimate president and placed numerous sanctions on Maduro and his allies.

The White House downplayed Trump's comments about his conversation with Putin, saying the president was merely relaying the Russian leader's message.

Updated at 3:41 p.m.