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State Dept. extends travel ban to North Korea

State Dept. extends travel ban to North Korea
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The Trump administration is extending a travel ban for Americans traveling to North Korea through next year, according to a State Department memo released Monday.

The ban, originally instituted in June 2017, will remain in place until Aug. 31, 2020, unless revoked earlier by Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoArmenia and Azerbaijan say they will implement ceasefire agreement Monday Entire Nigerian police force mobilized after days of violent protests that have killed at least 69 Hillicon Valley: Treasury sanctions Russian group accused of targeting critical facilities | Appeals court rules Uber, Lyft must comply with labor laws | Biden: Countries that target US elections will 'pay a price' MORE, according to The Associated Press.

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It was imposed by then-Secretary of State Rex TillersonRex Wayne TillersonOcasio-Cortez, progressives call on Senate not to confirm lobbyists or executives to future administration posts Gary Cohn: 'I haven't made up my mind' on vote for president in November Kushner says 'Alice in Wonderland' describes Trump presidency: Woodward book MORE after the death of U.S. student Otto Warmbier, who was detained in North Korea. The ban was renewed once already, in 2018. 

U.S. citizens interested in going to North Korea for humanitarian- or journalism-related purposes will be able to apply for exceptions through the State Department. 

The travel ban extension comes amid a stall in nuclear negotiations between the U.S. and North Korea.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpFox News president, top anchors advised to quarantine after coronavirus exposure: report Six notable moments from Trump and Biden's '60 Minutes' interviews Biden on attacks on mental fitness: Trump thought '9/11 attack was 7/11 attack' MORE has said he will meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong UnKim Jong UnOvernight Defense: Biden nets military family endorsements | Final debate features North Korea exchange | Judge refuses to dismiss sexual assault case against top general Biden: Obama wouldn't 'legitimize' North Korea with meeting How Trump and Biden contrast on foreign policy MORE to discuss denuclearization later this year. The two leaders have met multiple times already on the issue but have been unable to reach an agreement.

Kim has overseen several weapon test launches in the last month despite warnings from South Korea.