Russia says it hopes US wouldn't release Trump-Putin calls

A spokesman for the Kremlin expressed concern that the U.S. could publish transcripts of calls between President TrumpDonald John TrumpCensus Bureau spends millions on ad campaign to mitigate fears on excluded citizenship question Bloomberg campaign: Primary is two-way race with Sanders Democratic senator meets with Iranian foreign minister MORE and Russian President Vladimir PutinVladimir Vladimirovich PutinWe should listen to John Bolton How impeachment damaged US foreign policy Trump administration mulling special negotiator for nuke talks with Russia: report MORE following the publication this week of a readout of a call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

The Associated Press reported that a Kremlin spokesman told reporters on a press call that such an action could harm already "troubled" U.S.-Russia relations.

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“We would like to hope that it wouldn’t come to that in our relations, which are already troubled by a lot of problems," said Dmitry Peskov.

“The materials related to conversations between heads of states are usually classified according to normal international practice,” he added.

A spokeswoman for Russia's foreign ministry also reportedly ripped into Democrats including Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiThe Hill's Morning Report - Sanders on the rise as Nevada debate looms Lawmakers push back at Trump's Pentagon funding grab for wall Malaysia says it will choose 5G partners based on own standards, not US recommendations MORE (D-Calif.), accusing them of turning the U.S. into a laughingstock.

“Is it the Democrats’ job to make a laughingstock of the United States?” she asked, according to the AP. “It’s exactly what Ms. Pelosi has done to Congress, the White House and other state institutions.”

The publication of the readout of Trump's call with Zelensky has added fuel to Democrats' pressing for impeachment proceedings, which Pelosi announced on Tuesday.

Democrats have accused Trump of improperly pressuring Zelensky to launch an investigation into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBloomberg campaign: Primary is two-way race with Sanders HuffPost reporter: Sanders could win plurality of delegates but lose nomination Meghan McCain to Joy Behar: 'You guys have done a piss-poor job of convincing me that I should vote for a Democrat' MORE after bringing up military aid during his call with the Ukrainian leader.

Republicans and allies of the White House have denied that Trump was involved in any wrongdoing, and argue that no language exists in the readout indicating that Trump exerted pressure on Zelensky to launch the probe.

Biden remains the top contender in the Democratic Party's 2020 presidential primary and has accused Trump of abusing the office of the presidency to attack his family while denying any wrongdoing himself.