Trump says Labour leader Corbyn 'would be so bad' for UK

Trump says Labour leader Corbyn 'would be so bad' for UK

President TrumpDonald John TrumpMost Americans break with Trump on Ukraine, but just 45 percent think he should be removed: poll Judge orders Democrats to give notice if they request Trump's NY tax returns Trump's doctor issues letter addressing 'speculation' about visit to Walter Reed MORE on Thursday warned that Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn would be "so bad" for the United Kingdom, prompting the British politician to accuse Trump of seeking to interfere in the country's upcoming general election.

The president phoned into a London radio show hosted by Nigel Farage, the controversial leader of the Brexit Party who is an adamant Trump supporter. During the call, Trump weighed in on the potential ripple effects of a Brexit deal and expressed admiration for Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

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"I have great relationships with many of the leaders, including Boris," Trump said. "He’s a fantastic man. And I think he’s the exact right guy for the times."

"And Corbyn would be so bad for your country," Trump said of the Labour Party leader. "He’d be so bad he’d take you in such a bad way. He’d take you into such bad places. But your country has potential potential. It’s a great country."

Corbyn on Thursday accused Trump of "trying to interfere in Britain’s election to get his friend Boris Johnson elected."

 

 

Trump's comments came about six weeks before the United Kingdom holds a special election called by Johnson as part of an effort to strengthen his hand and break the gridlock around Brexit negotiations.

Johnson's Conservative Party and Corbyn's Labour Party are viewed as the two most likely groups to seize the majority in parliament. The two party leaders differ on how to achieve Brexit and have contrasting relationships with Trump.

Trump has described Johnson as the British version of himself and spoken fondly of him, while Corbyn has positioned himself as an outspoken critic of the president.

The president largely avoided weighing in on the specifics of Brexit negotiations, other than to caution that the agreement being weighed could limit the ability of the U.S. and U.K. to negotiate a bilateral trade agreement.

Trump went on to deny that he was interested in including the National Health Service (NHS) in trade negotiations, and claimed Corbyn had pushed a rumor that he was.

But the president himself stirred confusion during a visit to London earlier this year when he said "everything" was on the table, a comment he later walked back to exclude the NHS.