Brazil's president says he tested negative for coronavirus

Brazil's president says he tested negative for coronavirus
© Stefani Reynolds

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, who met with President TrumpDonald John TrumpJoe Arpaio loses bid for his old position as sheriff Trump brushes off view that Russia denigrating Biden: 'Nobody's been tougher on Russia than I have' Trump tees up executive orders on economy but won't sign yet MORE last week, announced Friday he has tested negative for coronavirus, despite earlier reports that he tested positive.

Bolsonaro made the announcement on Facebook and Twitter.

Fox News and Brazilian news outlet Jornal O Dia reported earlier on Friday that Bolsonaro had tested positive for COVID-19 but that further testing would take place.

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Bolsonaro’s son, Eduardo Bolsonaro, who was cited by Fox News as confirming the initial test results, later disputed reports his father had contracted the virus.

“There are always those people who tell lies in the media and if the story is confirmed they say 'I told you!', if not there will be just 1 more fake news,” he tweeted.

Jair Bolsonaro met with Trump last week in Mar-a-Lago. Jair Bolsonaro’s press secretary, Fabio Wajngarten, who accompanied him on the trip, later tested positive for the virus.

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Felipe G. Martins, an aide to Jair Bolsonaro, also said Friday that the test results for Brazil's president had not yet been reported.

“The news that the President tested positive for covid-19 is false. The tests carried out on the material collected yesterday are still being carried out and no member of the delegation had access to the results. The process takes about 6 hours and only started this morning,” Martins tweeted.

Matt Schlapp, chairman of the American Conservative Union, which recently hosted this year's Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), where an attendee was later found to have the coronavirus, also disputed the initial reports. Eduardo Bolsonaro attended CPAC, though it's unclear if he had direct contact with the patient, as Schlapp and some lawmakers did.