Trudeau nominates first person of color to Canada's Supreme Court

Trudeau nominates first person of color to Canada's Supreme Court
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Canadian Prime Minister Justin TrudeauJustin Pierre James TrudeauBiden administration stokes frustration over Canada The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Goldman Sachs - Schumer moves ahead with likely-to-fail infrastructure vote US extends travel restrictions with Canada, Mexico MORE on Thursday nominated Mahmud Jamal to the Supreme Court of Canada, the first person of color to be nominated for the country’s high court.

Jamal has been on the Court of Appeal for Ontario since 2019, and he would fill the spot of Justice Rosalie Silberman Abella, who is retiring.

The announcement came Thursday, making Jamal the fourth judge that Trudeau has nominated to the high court since the prime minister assumed office in 2015, according to Bloomberg

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“I am pleased to announce the nomination of Justice Mahmud Jamal to the Supreme Court of Canada. Respected around the world, Canada’s Supreme Court is known for its strength, independence, and judicial excellence. I know that Justice Jamal, with his exceptional legal and academic experience and dedication to serving others, will be a valuable asset to our country’s highest court,” Trudeau said in a statement.

In his questionnaire, Jamal highlighted his pro bono work as one of his significant contributions.

“It is a privilege to be an advocate for any client—to be called in aid of another. But lawyers can derive special meaning by doing pro bono work, by helping clients secure access to justice or change the law for the better. Such work can allow lawyers to transcend quotidian concerns and join in something larger than themselves. That has certainly been true for me,” Jamal said.

Jamal was born in Nairobi, Kenya, in 1967, and he grew up in England and Canada, according to Canada’s Department of Justice.

Jamal was the first member of his family to attend college, getting his undergraduate degree in economics from University of Toronto. He studied law at McGill University and Yale University.