Electric car chargers to be required in new homes in England

British Prime Minister Boris JohnsonBoris JohnsonBoris Johnson under fire after video shows staff joking about Christmas party amid COVID-19 restrictions Afghan evacuation 'arbitrary and dysfunctional,' British whistleblower testifies Biden holds call with European leaders to talk Russia MORE on Monday announced that all new homes and buildings in England will be required to have electric car chargers installed beginning next year.

The legislation, which Johnson announced at the annual Confederation of British Industry (CBI) conference, will install up to 145,000 extra charging points throughout Europe every year, according to a statement from the prime minister’s office.

The requirement will also apply to buildings undergoing renovation. Facilities that are left with more than 10 parking spaces will be compelled to install electric vehicle charging points.

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The new venture comes in the lead-up to 2030, when the United Kingdom will stop selling new petrol and diesel cars.

Johnson said his announcement marks a “pivotal moment,” adding that the U.K. has to “adapt our economy to the green industrial revolution.”

“We have to use our massive investment in science and technology and we have to raise our productivity and then we have to get out your way,” the prime minister said in his CBI speech, according to his office.

“We must regulate less or better and take advantage of new freedoms,” he added.

The new workplace charging points that will be installed with the legislation adds to the 250,000 sites that the U.K. government has already supported, according to Johnson’s office.

The legislation will allow U.K. residents to purchase homes that already have electric charging points installed, which is especially helpful as the majority of electric car charging takes place at home, Johnson’s office noted.

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It will also ensure that charging spots are available at shops and workplaces throughout the country, which will make loading up electric cars as easy as refueling petrol or diesel vehicles.

The U.K. government also revealed that it will deliver a new three-year program of £150m that will help British small or medium-sized enterprises commercialize their most recent research and development innovations.

“This programme supports businesses to grow, scale up and create new highly-skilled jobs in the process, including those who would have otherwise been unable to secure private loans,” the prime minister’s office said in a statement.

Johnson’s announcement comes as some have raised concerns regarding a shortage in charging infrastructure, according to the BBC. Some have said there is a potential for “charging blackspots” in small towns and rural areas because the rollout of charging locations has slowed, while others are saying that Britons must be safeguarded from exorbitant pricing for charging electric vehicles in public, as home charging is significantly cheaper.