Canada warns Trump: Huawei extradition shouldn't be ‘politicized’

Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland cautioned the Trump administration Friday against seeking to leverage the pending extradition of Chinese technology executive Meng Wanzhou. 

“Canada understands the rule of law and extradition ought not ever to be politicized or used as tools to resolve other issues,” she told reporters after meeting with Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoTrump has one final chance with American partners of first resort Trump administration’s top European diplomat to resign in February Brzezinski: 'I suspect' Dems will nominate woman in 2020, 'past time' to elect female president MORE and Secretary of Defense James MattisJames Norman MattisOvernight Defense: Supreme Court allows transgender ban to be enforced | Trump missile defense plan faces reality check | Experts warn of persistent ISIS threat 3 Michigan residents arrested for conspiring to provide material support to ISIS: DOJ The Hill's 12:30 Report — White House requests walk-through for State of the Union | Justices allow transgender ban to take effect | Trump vows to not 'cave' on wall MORE

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Her comments referred to President TrumpDonald John TrumpCoast Guard chief: 'Unacceptable' that service members must rely on food pantries, donations amid shutdown Dem lawmaker apologizes after saying it's never been legal in US to force people to work for free Grassley to hold drug pricing hearing MORE’s suggestion this week he may get involved in Meng’s case if it would improve negotiations with China over Washington and Beijing’s trade war.

“Whatever’s good for this country, I would do,” Trump said Tuesday. “If I think it’s good for what will be certainly the largest trade deal ever made — which is a very important thing — what’s good for national security — I would certainly intervene if I thought it was necessary.”

Meng, the CFO of Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei, was arrested earlier this month by Canadian authorities and faces extradition to the U.S. She has been accused of violating trade sanctions against Iran.

Meng was granted bail on Tuesday by a Canadian judge and will remain in Canada while she faces extradition proceedings.

“The detention of Ms. Meng was not a political decision on Canada's part,” Freeland said. “For Canada, this is a question of living up to our international treaty obligations and following the rule of law.”

China has retaliated by arresting two Canadian citizens, raising concerns that the issue could boil over into a larger diplomatic row. Pompeo called on China to release the two prisoners, calling the arrests “unacceptable” and “unlawful.”