US, in reversal, does not support Brazil's entry to OECD

US, in reversal, does not support Brazil's entry to OECD
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The U.S. government has reportedly rejected Brazil's attempt to enter the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), in a reversal after backing its bid for months.

Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoNPR reporter after Pompeo clash: Journalists don't interview government officials to score 'political points' NPR sends letter to State Dept. demanding answers for reporter's removal from trip Trump allies throw jabs at Bolton over book's claims MORE denied a petition to consider opening up the OECD to Brazil, according to a letter sent to OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurria on Aug. 28 that was obtained by Bloomberg. Pompeo said in the letter the U.S. only supported Argentina and Romania joining the 36-member group.

“The U.S. continues to prefer enlargement at a measured pace that takes into account the need to press for governance and succession planning,” Bloomberg reported the letter said.

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President TrumpDonald John TrumpCNN's Don Lemon explains handling of segment after Trump criticism NPR reporter after Pompeo clash: Journalists don't interview government officials to score 'political points' Lawyer says Parnas can't attend Senate trial due to ankle bracelet MORE had announced in a March press conference with Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro that he backed Brazil entering the OECD. Brazil submitted its application in May 2017. Commerce Secretary Wilbur RossWilbur Louis RossThe Hill's Morning Report - Report of Bolton tell-all manuscript roils Trump defense 'In any other administration': Trump's novel strategy for dealing with scandal Desperate Democrats badmouth economy even as it booms MORE confirmed Trump's announcement when visiting Brazil, according to Bloomberg.

A senior official told Bloomberg that the U.S. is supportive of an eventual Brazilian entry to the group but wants to prioritize Argentina and Romania because of their economic reform and free market commitment.

Membership in the nearly 60-year-old OECD is typically viewed as a sign of a country's developed economy.

OECD spokesperson in Washington confirmed that six prospective members have applied and are under consideration but declined to comment on the "confidential" discussions regarding the application approval.

The Hill reached out to the State Department for comment.