Half of UK residents say country may not exist in current form in a decade: poll

Half of UK residents say country may not exist in current form in a decade: poll
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Half of people residing in the United Kingdom, 50 percent, say they do not think the country will exist in its current form in a decade, according to an Ipsos MORI poll released this week.

That is a jump from 43 percent of respondents in 2014 who said they did not think the U.K. would exist in its current form in 10 years.

The latest survey found that just 29 percent of U.K. residents polled expect the country to definitely stay the same, down from 45 percent of respondents in 2014. 

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Forty-two percent of respondents said the U.K. would not exist in five years’ time, compared to 44 percent who said it would not.

The 2016 Brexit vote to leave the European Union has stirred uncertainly within the U.K., after Scotland and Northern Ireland voted to remain while England and Wales voted to leave.

Ahead of the U.K.’s latest Jan. 31 Brexit deadline, calls have increased for Scottish voters to hold an independence referendum, as well as a vote for Northern Ireland to unify with the Republic of Ireland, Reuters reported.

“While no one would expect public confidence in the Union’s future to be higher now than it was five years ago, what’s striking is just how much it’s dropped. These findings show that the British public are now much more divided in their expectations of the Union’s future than they were in 2014, when the Union’s future was under intense debate with Scotland just three months away from an independence referendum,” Emily Gray, managing director of Ipsos MORI Scotland, said.  

“With independence a key faultline in Scotland’s election debate, the findings will be concerning for those who want Scotland to remain in the Union, while those campaigning for an independent Scotland will hope that this is a continuing trend,” she continued.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson vowed not to allow a second Scottish independence referendum during his first visit to Scotland on his general election campaign trail this week, the Telegraph reported.

Ipsos MORI poll interviewed a sample of 1,001 adults across Britain from Oct. 25-28.