Putin: Russia must strengthen its nuclear arms

Putin: Russia must strengthen its nuclear arms
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Russian President Vladimir Putin said this week that his nation must guarantee its nuclear arsenal is capable of handling any global threats.

Putin’s call to action comes the same day President-elect Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump nominates Jeffrey Rosen to replace Rosenstein at DOJ McCabe says ‘it’s possible’ Trump is a Russian asset McCabe: Trump ‘undermining the role of law enforcement’ MORE also urged America to boost its nuclear weapons stockpile.

“We need to strengthen the strategic nuclear forces,” Putin said at a Russian Defense Ministry board meeting in Moscow Thursday, according to Tass.

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Putin also praised Russia’s nuclear triad, which is a nation’s nuclear weapons delivery system including intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), strategic bombers and submarine-launched ballistic missiles.

“The state of the nuclear triad that plays a key role in keeping strategic parity was maintained at the proper level," he said.

Putin said 60 percent of Russia’s nuclear armaments are modernized, and also urged the country not to neglect its non-nuclear military capabilities.

“[Our non-nuclear forces] must be taken to a higher level of quality so that they are capable of neutralizing any military threats,” he said.

“They have confirmed that units and formations can be promptly redeployed to large distances and they can create groupings within short time limits in strategic directions,” Putin added, citing four sudden combat readiness checks Russia’s military conducted in 2016.

Trump on Thursday, meanwhile, tweeted that the U.S. must significantly boost its nuclear arsenal to keep pace with others worldwide.

“The United States must greatly strengthen and expand its nuclear capabilities until such time as the world comes to its senses regarding nukes,” he said without specifying what prompted his message.

Trump previously proposed during his presidential bid that countries like Japan and Saudi Arabia should acquire nuclear weapons as a counter to antagonists like Iran and North Korea.

Such a policy runs counter to current U.S. policy at a time when America is expected to spend $1 trillion over the next 30 years upgrading its nuclear stockpile.