Trump aims to temper concern over China tariffs: 'We are right where we need to be'

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump cites tax cuts over judges as having biggest impact of his presidency Trump cites tax cuts over judges as having biggest impact of his presidency Ocasio-Cortez claps back at Trump after he cites her in tweet rejecting impeachment MORE insisted Sunday that the U.S. is “right where we need to be” regarding trade with China after the administration imposed a new round of tariffs last week.

“Remember, they broke the deal with us & tried to renegotiate. We will be taking in Tens of Billions of Dollars in Tariffs from China. Buyers of product can make it themselves in the USA (ideal), or buy it from non-Tariffed countries,” Trump tweeted Sunday afternoon.

“We will then spend (match or better) the money that China may no longer be spending with our Great Patriot Farmers (Agriculture), which is a small percentage of total Tariffs received, and distribute the food to starving people in nations around the world!” he added.

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Negotiations between the U.S. and China broke down last week, prompting the U.S. to hike tariffs from 10 percent to 25 percent on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports after Beijing officials  reportedly backtracked on their commitment to issues such as theft of intellectual property.

White House economic adviser Larry KudlowLawrence (Larry) Alan KudlowMORE said the administration expects retaliation by the Chinese, adding that Trump will likely meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping and continue negotiations in June.

Kudlow contradicted Trump in the same interview, agreeing with Fox News’s Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceSanders on Medicare for All: 'People don't like insurance companies, they like their doctors' Sanders on Medicare for All: 'People don't like insurance companies, they like their doctors' Pompeo: Controversy over Trump foreign campaign dirt comments a 'Washington piece of silliness' MORE that tariffs are paid by American importers rather than the Chinese. “Fair enough. In fact, both sides will pay in these things, and of course it depends,” Kudlow said. “But the Chinese will suffer [gross domestic product] losses and so forth with respect to a diminishing export market and goods that they may need.”