Trump suggested top intel officials refute collusion with Russians: report

President Trump reportedly suggested that top intelligence officials say publicly there was no collusion between his campaign and the Russians.

CNN, citing multiple sources, reported Thursday that two of the nation's top intelligence officials told special counsel Robert Mueller's team and Senate investigators about the president's suggestion.

The comments from the intelligence officials came last week in separate interviews, according to the network.

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Director of National Intelligence Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsHillicon Valley: Tim Cook visits White House | House hearing grapples with deepfake threat | Bill, Melinda Gates launch lobbying group | Tech turns to K-Street in antitrust fight | Lawsuit poses major threat to T-Mobile, Sprint merger Hillicon Valley: Tim Cook visits White House | House hearing grapples with deepfake threat | Bill, Melinda Gates launch lobbying group | Tech turns to K-Street in antitrust fight | Lawsuit poses major threat to T-Mobile, Sprint merger House Intel to take first major deep dive into threat of 'deepfakes' MORE and National Security Agency Director Mike Rogers reportedly talked about their interactions with Trump as being "odd and uncomfortable," CNN reported.

The two top intelligence officials said, however, they don't think Trump ordered them to interfere in the investigation into Russian meddling in the presidential election, including any possible links between Moscow and members of Trump's campaign.

According to CNN, they said they were surprised that Trump would suggest they say publicly there was no collusion.

The president has repeatedly decried the Russia probe and denied collusion between his campaign and the Russians.

"After 7 months of investigations & committee hearings about my 'collusion with the Russians,' nobody has been able to show any proof. Sad!" Trump tweeted last week.

Earlier this month, both Rogers and Coates testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee and repeatedly refused to answer lawmakers' questions about their conversations with Trump in an open setting, though both said they never felt pressured by the president.