Page delivers subpoenaed documents to Intelligence committees

Page delivers subpoenaed documents to Intelligence committees
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Former Trump campaign foreign policy adviser Carter Page on Thursday dropped off a bundle of documents under subpoena to both the House and Senate Intelligence Committees, in a brief appearance on Capitol Hill that drew a swarm of public attention. 

Page, wearing a red bucket hat, entered the Hart Senate Office Building alone as a massive scrum of reporters gathered outside of the nearby office of Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenIdentity politics and the race for the Democratic nomination Bill Maher defends Bernie Sanders campaign over sexual harassment allegations Gillibrand defends calling for Franken to resign during stop in Iowa MORE (D-Minn.), who earlier that morning was accused of groping a woman. 
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Page told reporters that the Senate Intelligence committee had requested more "irrelevant" documents, which he described as "all" of his business and personal records. That committee, he said, was behaving far less professionally than both the House Intelligence Committee and special counsel Robert Mueller's team. 
 
Page has interviewed with both committees in past weeks as part of their parallel investigations into Russian interference in the U.S. election. He declined to comment on his interactions with Mueller's team. 
 
"It's more witch-hunt style on this side, whereas they act more professional on the House side," Page said outside of the Senate office building that is home to the Intelligence committee's secure spaces.  

Page has long been of keen interest to lawmakers probing Russian election meddling, thanks to a 2016 trip he took to Moscow and his appearance in an unconfirmed dossier of opposition research alleging connections between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin.

In recent testimony to the House committee, Page denied any wrongdoing connected to Russia. He focused primarily on the allegations contained in the dossier — which he repeatedly referred to as “the dodgy dossier” — and his claim that he was the subject of illegal government surveillance.

Page, who has not retained a lawyer, spoke freely to reporters on Thursday before hopping in a cab and departing the Hill.