Susan Rice attorney denies message she sent herself on Trump's inauguration was 'unusual'

Susan Rice attorney denies message she sent herself on Trump's inauguration was 'unusual'
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An attorney for Susan Rice said on Friday that there was nothing "unusual" about an email the former national security adviser sent herself on President TrumpDonald John TrumpPapadopoulos claims he was pressured to sign plea deal Tlaib asking colleagues to support impeachment investigation resolution Trump rips 'Mainstream Media': 'They truly are the Enemy of the People' MORE's Inauguration Day.

The email — which apparently memorializes a meeting with former President Obama, former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyTlaib asking colleagues to support impeachment investigation resolution Democrats face dilemma after Mueller probe ends Barr faces political storm over Mueller report MORE and former Deputy Attorney General Sally YatesSally Caroline YatesA question of privilege: How Trump could still gut the Mueller report From border to Mueller, Barr faces challenges as attorney general Hillicon Valley: House Intel panel will release Russia interviews | T-Mobile, Sprint step up merger push | DHS cyber office hosting webinars on China | Nest warns customers to shore up password security MORE — was revealed earlier this month by Sens. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleySenate GOP eyes probes into 2016 issues 'swept under the rug' Treasury expands penalty relief to more taxpayers Overnight Health Care: Senators seek CBO input on preventing surprise medical bills | Oversight panel seeks OxyContin documents | Pharmacy middlemen to testify on prices | Watchdog warns air ambulances can put patients at 'financial risk' MORE (R-Iowa) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition - Dems look for traction following Barr-Mueller findings Senate GOP eyes probes into 2016 issues 'swept under the rug' Top Senate Judiciary Dem asks Barr to hand over full Mueller report by April 1 MORE (R-S.C.).

The meeting touched on whether the Obama administration should withhold certain information about the FBI investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election from the Trump administration.

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Grassley and Graham have raised questions about why Rice would send herself "such an unusual email purporting to document a conversation involving President Obama and his interactions with the FBI regarding the Trump/Russia investigation."

Rice's attorney denied the word "unusual" applied.

"There is nothing ‘unusual’ about the National Security Advisor memorializing an important discussion for the record," Kathryn Ruemmler said in a statement. 

"The Obama White House was justifiably concerned about how comprehensive they should be in their briefings regarding Russia to members of the Trump transition team, particularly Lt. General Michael Flynn, given the concerning communications between him and Russian officials," she said.

She went on to say that the meeting had nothing to do with the controversial dossier that Republicans say underlies the investigation into Russian interference.

"The discussion that Ambassador Rice documented did not involve the so-called Steele dossier," she continued. "Any insinuation that Ambassador Rice’s actions in this matter were inappropriate is yet another attempt to distract and deflect from the importance of the ongoing investigations into Russian meddling in America’s democracy."

Michael Flynn, Trump's first national security adviser, resigned from the post within weeks of taking office after it was revealed that he had lied to the FBI and Vice President Pence about his contacts with the Russian ambassador to the U.S. 

Flynn pleaded guilty in December to lying to the FBI about his contacts with the Russian ambassador, and acknowledged that he is cooperating with special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE's investigation into whether the Trump campaign colluded with Moscow to disrupt and influence the 2016 election.