Susan Rice attorney denies message she sent herself on Trump's inauguration was 'unusual'

Susan Rice attorney denies message she sent herself on Trump's inauguration was 'unusual'
© Getty Images

An attorney for Susan Rice said on Friday that there was nothing "unusual" about an email the former national security adviser sent herself on President TrumpDonald TrumpBaldwin calls Trump criticism following 'Rust' shooting 'surreal' Haley hits the stump in South Carolina Mary Trump files to dismiss Trump's lawsuit over NYT tax story MORE's Inauguration Day.

The email — which apparently memorializes a meeting with former President Obama, former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyCountering the ongoing Republican delusion How Biden should sell his infrastructure bill 'Finally, infrastructure week!': White House celebrates T bill MORE and former Deputy Attorney General Sally YatesSally Caroline YatesFormer Chicago Red Stars players accuse ex-coach of verbal, emotional abuse An unquestioning press promotes Rep. Adam Schiff's book based on Russia fiction Sally Yates reveals breast cancer battle MORE — was revealed earlier this month by Sens. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyGOP blocks bill to expand gun background checks after Michigan school shooting GOP ramps up attacks on SALT deduction provision Graham emerges as go-to ally for Biden's judicial picks MORE (R-Iowa) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham emerges as go-to ally for Biden's judicial picks This Thanksgiving, skip the political food fights and talk UFOs instead Biden move to tap oil reserves draws GOP pushback MORE (R-S.C.).

The meeting touched on whether the Obama administration should withhold certain information about the FBI investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election from the Trump administration.

ADVERTISEMENT

Grassley and Graham have raised questions about why Rice would send herself "such an unusual email purporting to document a conversation involving President Obama and his interactions with the FBI regarding the Trump/Russia investigation."

Rice's attorney denied the word "unusual" applied.

"There is nothing ‘unusual’ about the National Security Advisor memorializing an important discussion for the record," Kathryn Ruemmler said in a statement. 

"The Obama White House was justifiably concerned about how comprehensive they should be in their briefings regarding Russia to members of the Trump transition team, particularly Lt. General Michael Flynn, given the concerning communications between him and Russian officials," she said.

She went on to say that the meeting had nothing to do with the controversial dossier that Republicans say underlies the investigation into Russian interference.

"The discussion that Ambassador Rice documented did not involve the so-called Steele dossier," she continued. "Any insinuation that Ambassador Rice’s actions in this matter were inappropriate is yet another attempt to distract and deflect from the importance of the ongoing investigations into Russian meddling in America’s democracy."

Michael Flynn, Trump's first national security adviser, resigned from the post within weeks of taking office after it was revealed that he had lied to the FBI and Vice President Pence about his contacts with the Russian ambassador to the U.S. 

Flynn pleaded guilty in December to lying to the FBI about his contacts with the Russian ambassador, and acknowledged that he is cooperating with special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerAn unquestioning press promotes Rep. Adam Schiff's book based on Russia fiction Senate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG MORE's investigation into whether the Trump campaign colluded with Moscow to disrupt and influence the 2016 election.