Senate panel invites Comey, former officials to briefing in Russia probe

Senate panel invites Comey, former officials to briefing in Russia probe
© Greg Nash

The Senate Intelligence Committee is expressing an interest in hearing from former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyComey says he has a 'fantasy' about deleting his Twitter account after end of Trump term We need answers to questions mainstream media won't ask about Democrats Trump 'constantly' discusses using polygraphs to stem leaks: report MORE again as part of its investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

The committee announced in a notice issued Friday afternoon that it has invited Comey and three other former top intelligence officials to a closed-door hearing next week.

It is unclear whether Comey plans to attend the hearing, though former Director of National Intelligence James ClapperJames Robert ClapperWe need answers to questions mainstream media won't ask about Democrats Whistleblowers and the hypocrisy of the ruling class Hillicon Valley: Clapper praises whistleblower complaint | Senators urge social media giants to take action against 'deepfakes' | Tim Cook asks Supreme Court to protect DACA | Harris pushes Twitter to suspend Trump MORE, former CIA Director John BrennanJohn Owen BrennanKrystal Ball defends praise of Yang: I am not 'a Russian plant' We need answers to questions mainstream media won't ask about Democrats Former Reagan official rips Republicans for backing Trump: 'It's like the invasion of the body snatchers' MORE and former National Security Agency (NSA) Director Mike RogersMichael (Mike) Dennis RogersHillicon Valley: Warren takes on Facebook over political ads | Zuckerberg defends meetings with conservatives | Civil liberties groups sound alarm over online extremism bill Civil liberties groups sound alarm over online extremism bill Extremists find new home in online app Telegram MORE are all expected to attend.

The hearing, which is expected take place Wednesday morning, will delve into the intelligence community’s work compiling the 2017 assessment cataloging Russian interference in the election, according to the committee.

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Trump fired Comey last May, a move the president has indicated was at least partly motivated by the ongoing federal probe into Russia's election meddling. That investigation, which Comey led before his ouster, is now being spearheaded by special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerFox News legal analyst says Trump call with Ukraine leader could be 'more serious' than what Mueller 'dragged up' Lewandowski says Mueller report was 'very clear' in proving 'there was no obstruction,' despite having 'never' read it Fox's Cavuto roasts Trump over criticism of network MORE.

It has been nearly a year since Comey’s bombshell testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee during which he recounted his version of the circumstances leading up to his firing.

Comey told the committee in June that the president directed him to end the investigation into former national security adviser Michael Flynn, who has since pleaded guilty to lying to FBI agents and is cooperating in Mueller’s probe.

Trump has disputed Comey’s account.

More recently, Comey has attracted huge media attention for the release of his memoir that also focuses on his firing, sparking renewed criticism from the president and his allies.

The Senate panel has been investigating Russian interference since early 2017. Chairman Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrJuan Williams: Trump, the conspiracy theory president Blood cancer patients deserve equal access to the cure Senate Intelligence report triggers new calls for action on election security MORE (R-N.C.) told reporters this week the committee plans to wrap up its investigation in August.

On Tuesday, the committee released the first portion of its unclassified report, detailing Moscow’s “unprecedented, coordinated cyber campaign” against digital U.S. voting infrastructure in the states leading up to the election.