House conservatives introduce resolution calling for second special counsel

House conservatives introduce resolution calling for second special counsel
© Greg Nash

House conservatives introduced a resolution on Tuesday calling for the appointment of a second special counsel to investigate possible misconduct by the Department of Justice and the FBI during the 2016 presidential race. 

"The Justice Department cannot be expected to investigate itself," Rep. Lee ZeldinLee ZeldinBoth sides of the aisle call for local, state, federal cooperation on homelessness Trump tweets American flag amid reports of strike against Iranian general House votes to temporarily repeal Trump SALT deduction cap MORE (R-N.Y.), flanked by 11 other Republican lawmakers, said at a press conference announcing the measure. 

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Zeldin said Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsICE subpoenas Denver law enforcement: report Bottom Line DOJ inquiry tied to Clinton, touted by Trump winds down with no tangible results: report MORE should tap an independent investigator to examine whether FBI and Justice Department officials obtained surveillance warrants with insufficient evidence.

The Republicans also want a probe to look into the government's decision to end the investigation of former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSupreme Court agrees to hear 'faithless elector' cases Poll: Sanders holds 5-point lead over Buttigieg in New Hampshire Climate 'religion' is fueling Australia's wildfires MORE's use of a private email server and the reasoning behind the government's decision to launch a probe into possible ties between the Trump campaign and Russia.

House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows (N.C.) and Reps. Jim Jordan (Ohio), Matt Gaetz (Fla.), Louie Gohmert (Texas), Claudia Tenney (N.Y.) and Jody HiceJody Brownlow HiceHouse GOP lawmaker wants Senate to hold 'authentic' impeachment trial GOP lawmaker reacts to Democrats moving forward on impeachment The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday MORE (Ga.) were among the Republicans at the press conference.

The press conference came a day after an unusual meeting at the White House between President TrumpDonald John TrumpNational Archives says it altered Trump signs, other messages in Women's March photo Dems plan marathon prep for Senate trial, wary of Trump trying to 'game' the process Democratic lawmaker dismisses GOP lawsuit threat: 'Take your letter and shove it' MORE and Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinJournalist alleging Obama administration spied on her seeks to reopen case Rosenstein on his time in Trump administration: 'We got all the big issues right' Rod Rosenstein joins law and lobbying firm MORE, who oversees special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSchiff: Trump acquittal in Senate trial would not signal a 'failure' Jeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay MORE's investigation into Russia's role in the 2016 presidential election.

Rosenstein has agreed to have the Department of Justice inspector general review whether the FBI has done anything inappropriate in its investigation of the Trump campaign, which predated Mueller's probe. Trump demanded action after reports that an FBI informant talked to three members of the Trump campaign team. 

Sessions has declined requests for an additional special counsel but did tap John Huber, a federal prosecutor in Utah, to look into allegations last month. 

The 12-page resolution lists a series of points that the lawmakers say warrant an investigation.

The document questions whether top FBI and Justice Department officials acted in a politically motivated way during the election, including how "insufficient intelligence and biased motivations" may have launched the counterintelligence investigation into Russian interference.

The resolution alleges that "deeply flawed and questionable" Foreign Surveillance Act warrant applications were obtained during the election by government officials to surveil Trump campaign aides. It says the warrants were obtained on the basis of "illicit sources and politically biased intelligence."

Democrats have blasted the GOP calls for a second special counsel as an attempt to distract or even undermine Mueller's investigation in order to shield Trump. 

The lawmakers attending the press conference, when asked, said the president has not encouraged them to pursue this resolution.