FBI contradicts Trump claim that China hacked Clinton’s private email server

The FBI on Wednesday said it had found no evidence about President TrumpDonald John TrumpFive landmark moments of testimony to Congress Lindsey Graham basks in the impeachment spotlight Democrats sharpen their message on impeachment MORE's claim that former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonFive landmark moments of testimony to Congress Top diplomat said request for specific probes in Ukraine was 'contrary' to US policy Feehery: What Republicans must do to adapt to political realignment MORE's private email server was compromised by hackers working for the Chinese government.

In a brief statement, the bureau said: “The FBI has not found any evidence the servers were compromised.”

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The statement follows the president's tweets earlier Wednesday claiming, without evidence, that Clinton's emails had been hacked by China.

"Hillary Clinton’s Emails, many of which are Classified Information, got hacked by China. Next move better be by the FBI & DOJ or, after all of their other missteps (Comey, McCabe, Strzok, Page, Ohr, FISA, Dirty Dossier etc.), their credibility will be forever gone!" Trump tweeted.

Trump had earlier sent another tweet with the claim.

"Report just out: “China hacked Hillary Clinton’s private Email Server.” Are they sure it wasn’t Russia (just kidding!)? What are the odds that the FBI and DOJ are right on top of this? Actually, a very big story. Much classified information!," Trump said. 

It was not immediately clear which report Trump was referencing. The Washington Post reported that the tweets had come after a Daily Caller story that cited anonymous law enforcement sources with the claim.

That Daily Caller story said that the intelligence community's inspector general had found that a copy of every email on the server "was being sent to a third party and that third party was a known Chinese public company that was involved in collecting intelligence for China."

Trump had said during the 2016 presidential race that he would seek a new investigation of Clinton if elected, but later walked back that claim.

China's foreign ministry denied the claims, Reuters reported
 
"This isn’t the first time we’ve heard similar kinds of allegations,” spokeswoman Hua Chunying said at a daily news briefing, according to Reuters.
 
“China is a staunch defender of cybersecurity. We firmly oppose and crack down on any forms of internet attacks and the stealing of secrets,” she added.