House Intelligence Committee to vote Friday on releasing dozens of Russia probe transcripts

House Intelligence Committee to vote Friday on releasing dozens of Russia probe transcripts

The House Intelligence Committee will vote Friday on publicly releasing a slew of transcripts of closed-door interviews from its now closed investigation into Russian interference, including those with high-profile members of President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump nominates Jeffrey Rosen to replace Rosenstein at DOJ McCabe says ‘it’s possible’ Trump is a Russian asset McCabe: Trump ‘undermining the role of law enforcement’ MORE's campaign.

Chairman Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Lawmakers scramble as shutdown deadline nears ‘Fox & Friends’ host asks if McCabe opening FBI probe into Trump was attempt to ‘overthrow government’ Nunes says GOP lawmakers looking through Russia transcripts, will make DOJ referrals MORE (R-Calif.) has scheduled a business meeting for 9 a.m. for the committee to vote on releasing the documents.

The documents include transcripts of interviews with prominent members of the Trump campaign and the president’s family, including Steve BannonStephen (Steve) Kevin BannonFormer Carter pollster, Bannon ally Patrick Caddell dies at 68 In next election against populists, centrist forces already making mistakes Chris Christie: Kushner’s dad committed 'one of the most loathsome, disgusting crimes that I prosecuted’ MORE, Hope HicksHope Charlotte HicksWhite House spokeswoman leaving to join PR firm Hillicon Valley: House Intel panel will release Russia interviews | T-Mobile, Sprint step up merger push | DHS cyber office hosting webinars on China | Nest warns customers to shore up password security House Intel panel votes to release Russia interview transcripts to Mueller MORE, Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerDems open new front against Trump Dems launch investigation into Trump administration's dealings with Saudi Arabia The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the American Academy of HIV Medicine - Will there be any last-minute shutdown drama? MORE and Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpTrump has publicly criticized Russia probe more than 1,100 times: NY Times Trump, Harris, Ocasio-Cortez, Charlie Kirk among Twitter's most-engaged users Trump Jr. blasts Alec Baldwin: 'Spare everyone your bulls---' MORE, as well as those with Trump’s former personal attorney, Michael Cohen, and longtime Trump ally Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneRoger Stone invokes gag order in new fundraiser Trump has publicly criticized Russia probe more than 1,100 times: NY Times The Hill's 12:30 Report: Sanders set to shake up 2020 race MORE.

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They also include transcripts of interviews with officials from former President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaThe Memo: Bernie Sanders’s WH launch sharpens ‘socialist’ question Obama spends Presidents Day at Ayesha Curry's San Francisco restaurant Government's misguided holiday to celebrate itself MORE's administration, including former Director of National Intelligence James ClapperJames Robert ClapperIntelligence chiefs should be commended, despite Trump's attacks on them Hillicon Valley: House Intel panel will release Russia interviews | T-Mobile, Sprint step up merger push | DHS cyber office hosting webinars on China | Nest warns customers to shore up password security House Intel panel votes to release Russia interview transcripts to Mueller MORE and former Deputy Attorney General Sally YatesSally Caroline YatesFrom border to Mueller, Barr faces challenges as attorney general Hillicon Valley: House Intel panel will release Russia interviews | T-Mobile, Sprint step up merger push | DHS cyber office hosting webinars on China | Nest warns customers to shore up password security House Intel panel votes to release Russia interview transcripts to Mueller MORE.

The House panel’s investigation began early last year and quickly devolved into partisan infighting, resulting in the panel ending its probe in a party-line vote in March of this year. The Republican majority subsequently released a report finding no collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Democrats, however, argued that Republicans ended the investigation prematurely.

Nunes said earlier this month that he planned to release the documents before the November midterm elections, after Democrats on the committee had clamored for their release.

“We believe that the depositions that we took, I think nearly about 70 people, those need to be published and they need to be published I think before the election,” Nunes said on Fox News on Sept. 16.

The interview transcripts -- 53 in all -- would first go through a declassification review by the Office of Director of National Intelligence, should the committee vote in favor of their release. It is unclear how long that process would take.