House Intelligence Committee to vote Friday on releasing dozens of Russia probe transcripts

House Intelligence Committee to vote Friday on releasing dozens of Russia probe transcripts

The House Intelligence Committee will vote Friday on publicly releasing a slew of transcripts of closed-door interviews from its now closed investigation into Russian interference, including those with high-profile members of President TrumpDonald John TrumpThorny part of obstruction of justice is proving intent, that's a job for Congress Obama condemns attacks in Sri Lanka as 'an attack on humanity' Schiff rips Conway's 'display of alternative facts' on Russian election interference MORE's campaign.

Chairman Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesTen post-Mueller questions that could turn the tables on Russia collusion investigators Schiff, Nunes pressed DOJ for Mueller briefing The Hill's Morning Report - Mueller report will dominate this week MORE (R-Calif.) has scheduled a business meeting for 9 a.m. for the committee to vote on releasing the documents.

The documents include transcripts of interviews with prominent members of the Trump campaign and the president’s family, including Steve BannonStephen (Steve) Kevin BannonScaramucci: Mr. President, the press is not the enemy of the people MSNBC to relaunch 'On Assignment' series with foreign correspondent Richard Engel Corporate self-regulation is failing MORE, Hope HicksHope Charlotte HicksEnd of Mueller shifts focus to existing probes Trump feared Mueller's appointment: 'This is the end of my Presidency' Investigators in Trump hush money probe interviewed Hicks, security chief: report MORE, Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerNadler: I don't understand why Mueller didn't charge Donald Trump Jr., others in Trump Tower meeting Trump Tower meeting: A shining example of what not to investigate Impeachment? Not so fast without missing element of criminal intent MORE and Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpNadler: I don't understand why Mueller didn't charge Donald Trump Jr., others in Trump Tower meeting Impeachment? Not so fast without missing element of criminal intent House Dem calls on lawmakers to 'insulate' election process following Mueller report MORE, as well as those with Trump’s former personal attorney, Michael Cohen, and longtime Trump ally Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneEnd of Mueller shifts focus to existing probes Heavily redacted Mueller report leaves major questions unanswered The Hill's Morning Report — Category 5 Mueller storm to hit today MORE.

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They also include transcripts of interviews with officials from former President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaObama condemns attacks in Sri Lanka as 'an attack on humanity' Trump hits Romney for Mueller criticism Former Bush assistant: Mueller report makes Obama look 'just plain bad' MORE's administration, including former Director of National Intelligence James ClapperJames Robert ClapperTen post-Mueller questions that could turn the tables on Russia collusion investigators Trump campaign falsely claims Barr revealed 'unlawful spying' in email to supporters Clapper: Barr's spying claim 'stunning and scary' MORE and former Deputy Attorney General Sally YatesSally Caroline YatesTrump appears alongside Ocasio-Cortez on Time 100 list Sally Yates: Barr should release Mueller report as soon as possible A question of privilege: How Trump could still gut the Mueller report MORE.

The House panel’s investigation began early last year and quickly devolved into partisan infighting, resulting in the panel ending its probe in a party-line vote in March of this year. The Republican majority subsequently released a report finding no collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Democrats, however, argued that Republicans ended the investigation prematurely.

Nunes said earlier this month that he planned to release the documents before the November midterm elections, after Democrats on the committee had clamored for their release.

“We believe that the depositions that we took, I think nearly about 70 people, those need to be published and they need to be published I think before the election,” Nunes said on Fox News on Sept. 16.

The interview transcripts -- 53 in all -- would first go through a declassification review by the Office of Director of National Intelligence, should the committee vote in favor of their release. It is unclear how long that process would take.