Bombs targeting Dems raise new fears

Explosive devices were sent Tuesday and Wednesday to former President Obama, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonFox News poll: Biden ahead of Trump in Nevada, Pennsylvania and Ohio Trump, Biden court Black business owners in final election sprint The power of incumbency: How Trump is using the Oval Office to win reelection MORE and other Democrats, as well as CNN, raising new fears about violence in a politically polarized country just two weeks from midterm elections that could change the power structure in Washington.

The suspicious packages led to the evacuation of the Time Warner building in Manhattan and a full investigation involving the Secret Service as well as federal, state and local authorities.

Packages were also addressed to former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderThe Hill's Campaign Report: Trump's rally risk | Biden ramps up legal team | Biden hits Trump over climate policy Biden campaign forming 'special litigation' team ahead of possible voting battle Pompeo, Engel poised for battle in contempt proceedings MORE and Rep. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersPowell, Mnuchin stress limits of current emergency lending programs Pelosi: House will stay in session until agreement is reached on coronavirus relief Omar invokes father's death from coronavirus in reaction to Woodward book MORE (D-Calif.).

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A suspicious package also led to the evacuation of former Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman SchultzDeborah (Debbie) Wasserman SchultzFlorida Democrat introduces bill to recognize Puerto Rico statehood referendum Five things to watch at the Democratic National Convention Michelle Obama wishes Barack a happy birthday: 'My favorite guy' MORE’s congressional office in Florida. Her address had been listed as the return address on the package addressed to Holder.

All of the people targeted by the packages have been frequently criticized by President TrumpDonald John TrumpSteele Dossier sub-source was subject of FBI counterintelligence probe Pelosi slams Trump executive order on pre-existing conditions: It 'isn't worth the paper it's signed on' Trump 'no longer angry' at Romney because of Supreme Court stance MORE, who condemned the attempted attacks as “abhorrent” during remarks from the White House on Wednesday afternoon.

“We are extremely angry, upset, unhappy about what we witnessed this morning and we will get to the bottom of it,” Trump said.

Both parties have complained that the other has engaged in dangerous rhetoric that threatens to spill over into actual violence.

Republicans as part of their closing arguments for the midterms have warned voters against giving congressional majorities to a liberal “mob” that would be empowered by Democrats, pointing to the recent confirmation fight over Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughTrump faces tricky choice on Supreme Court pick The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump stokes fears over November election outcome The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump previews SCOTUS nominee as 'totally brilliant' MORE as an example.

A little more than a year ago, Rep. Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseHouse GOP slated to unveil agenda ahead of election House panel details 'serious' concerns around Florida, Georgia, Texas, Wisconsin elections Scalise hit with ethics complaint over doctored Barkan video MORE (R-La.) was gravely wounded in a shooting at a congressional baseball practice by a man who opposed Trump and ranted about politics in social media posts.

“I have experienced first-hand the effects of political violence, and am committed to using my voice to speak out against it wherever I can,” Scalise said Wednesday.

Democrats blame Trump for lowering the level of discourse in the country. Trump has criticized Waters as having a “low IQ” and repeatedly called for Clinton to be jailed. “Lock her up” remains a popular chant at his rallies.

The first explosive device was discovered by the Secret Service on Tuesday night and had been addressed to Clinton's home in Chappaqua, N.Y. On Wednesday morning, another device sent to Obama’s home in Washington, D.C., was discovered by the Secret Service.

Later on Wednesday, CNN was forced to evacuate its New York studios after a suspected bomb along with an envelope of white powder was found in a package in the company’s mailroom. That package was addressed to former CIA Director John BrennanJohn Owen BrennanJournalism or partisanship? The media's mistakes of 2016 continue in 2020 Comey on Clinton tweet: 'I regret only being involved in the 2016 election' Ex-CIA Director Brennan questioned for 8 hours in Durham review of Russia probe MORE, a frequent critic of Trump’s.

Other suspicious packages were sent to Holder and Waters; the latter was discovered at a congressional mail-sorting location in Maryland.

A building in San Diego that houses the offices of The San Diego Union-Tribune and Democratic Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisHundreds of lawyers from nation's oldest African American sorority join effort to fight voter suppression Biden picks up endorsement from progressive climate group 350 Action 3 reasons why Biden is misreading the politics of court packing MORE (Calif.) was also evacuated after a suspicious package was reportedly identified outside.

In a statement later Wednesday, the FBI linked the packages sent to the Clintons, Obamas, CNN and Holder to one mailed to the Bedford, N.Y., home of billionaire philanthropist George Soros that was investigated and safely detonated by authorities on Monday.

The bureau said that the packages have been sent to the FBI Laboratory in Quantico, Va., for further analysis.

Officials remain on high alert given the possibility more suspicious devices could be found.

Clinton and lawmakers from both parties called for officials to dial back their rhetoric in response to the attempted attacks.

“We’ve got to tone down the rhetoric. Both sides,” Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeHow fast population growth made Arizona a swing state Jeff Flake: Republicans 'should hold the same position' on SCOTUS vacancy as 2016 Republican former Michigan governor says he's voting for Biden MORE (R-Ariz.), who recently revealed that his family had received death threats “from the right,” said. “We’ve got to see people as opponents, not enemies.”

“Don’t encourage violence, don’t encourage hatred, don’t encourage attacks on media,” New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said at a press conference on Wednesday afternoon. “Unfortunately, this atmosphere of hatred is contributing to the choices people are making to turn to violence.”

Trump said Wednesday that the United States must “unify” in condemnation of the threats.

“In these times, we have to unify. We have to come together and send one strong unmistakable message that acts and threats of political violence of any kind have no place in the United States of America,” Trump said. “This egregious conduct is abhorrent to everything we hold dear and sacred as Americans.”

Officials in New York said Wednesday they would continue to investigate the unidentified white powder contained in the envelope sent to CNN.

While details surrounding the attempted attacks remain scarce, de Blasio said Wednesday he believes they are part of a terrorist plot.

“What we saw here today was an effort to terrorize. This clearly is an act of terror, attempting to undermine our free press and leaders of this country through acts of violence,” de Blasio said. “The people of New York City will not be intimidated.”

Federal officials are expected to provide updates on their findings, but its unclear when further details about the devices or any suspects in the cases will be revealed. 

This story was updated at 5:03 p.m.