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Dems plan to bring in Mueller for televised hearings if Trump fires him: report

Top Democrats in the House are reportedly planning to invite Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE to testify on Capitol Hill in televised hearings if President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden holds massive cash advantage over Trump ahead of Election Day Tax records show Trump maintains a Chinese bank account: NYT Trump plays video of Biden, Harris talking about fracking at Pennsylvania rally MORE takes action to fire the special counsel and shut down the Russia investigation.

Senior Democratic aides told Politico that if Trump were to fire Mueller and other members of the Justice Department's leadership in a scenario similar to Nixon's Saturday Night Massacre, Democrats would respond by inviting Mueller to testify before the House in a televised hearing.

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"I think you could expect Democrats to take pieces of what they shut down and expose it publicly,” a senior aide familiar with House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: McConnell says he would give Trump-backed coronavirus deal a Senate vote | Pelosi, Mnuchin see progress, but no breakthrough | Trump, House lawyers return to court in fight over financial records Progress, but no breakthrough, on coronavirus relief McConnell says he would give Trump-backed coronavirus deal a vote in Senate MORE's (D-Calif.) thinking told Politico.

“This is a report paid for with taxpayer dollars. So taxpayers would have a right to know what Mr. Mueller found," the aide continued.

Trump has attacked Mueller and the special counsel investigation, which he calls a "witch hunt," for months despite several top members of his campaign being ensnared in criminal charges related to the investigation.

In April, the president suggested that he has been advised to fire the special counsel, and it was reported that Trump had previously attempted to do so last year.

The White House has publicly maintained that Trump has no plans to fire the special counsel or other top leaders at the Department of Justice, including Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsHarris walks fine line on Barrett as election nears The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump's erratic tweets upend stimulus talks; COVID-19 spreads in White House The Memo: Team Trump looks to Pence to steady ship in VP debate MORE, who is expected to exit following this week's midterm elections.

“As we’ve said many times before, we have no intention of firing the special counsel,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said at a press briefing in April.

“We've been beyond cooperative with them, we're continuing to cooperate with them," she added.

Rep. Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffGreenwald slams Schiff over Biden emails on Fox Hillicon Valley: DOJ accuses Russian hackers of targeting 2018 Olympics, French elections | Federal commission issues recommendations for securing critical tech against Chinese threats | House Democrats slam FCC over 'blatant attempt to help' Trump Federal commission issues recommendations for securing critical tech against Chinese threats MORE (D-Calif.), who is set to become the new chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, said on MSNBC that Democrats could protect Mueller the way Republicans would not do.

“I think that the chances that Bob Mueller will be able to finish his work improved for the reason that our committee and others like the Government Reform Committee and the Judiciary Committee, which under Republican leadership served as basically surrogates for the president in their efforts to batter down the Justice Department, to give the president a pretext ... to fire people in the Justice Department, all of that tearing down of the independence of these institutions is going to end,” Schiff said.

“Now that doesn’t mean the president can’t still act in ways that are antithetical to the rule of law and the interest of justice, but it does mean that we’re better able to protect our institutions and see this investigation, I hope, complete.”