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Mueller expected to issue more indictments soon: report

Special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerWhy a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel CNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump MORE is expected to issue more indictments in the coming days as acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker settles into his new role overseeing Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, CBS News reported Tuesday.

“I’ve spoken with many sources with knowledge of the Special Counsel investigation, and we do expect new indictments to be coming as soon as today,” CBS correspondent Paula Reid reported Tuesday. 

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The special counsel has already charged four Americans once affiliated with the Trump campaign and more than a dozen Russians in his inquiry into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Moscow in 2016. 

The report comes one day after Jerome Corsi, a conservative commentator and conspiracy theorist who is an associate of Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneTwo alleged Oath Keepers from Roger Stone security detail added to conspiracy indictment Authorities arrest Oath Keeper leader seen with Roger Stone Political land mines await Garland at DOJ MORE, stated his belief that he will soon be indicted.

“I’m going to be criminally charged,” Corsi said during a YouTube livestream. “As of today, right now, I expect to be indicted.”

Corsi also said he tried to cooperate with the investigation.

Mueller is investigating Stone’s alleged contacts with WikiLeaks, the group famous for publishing classified government documents. Stone’s interactions with WikiLeaks came under scrutiny after the group released emails during the 2016 presidential election that had been hacked from the Democratic Party and 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWhy does Bernie Sanders want to quash Elon Musk's dreams? Republican legislators target private sector election grants How Democrats can defy the odds in 2022 MORE's campaign chairman, John Podesta. 

Stone has denied having any prior knowledge of the email dump, maintaining that the information he shared about a potential WikiLeaks release was all publicly available.

The New York Times reported earlier this month that former Trump campaign officials told Mueller that Stone gave the impression that he had a direct line to WikiLeaks. 

The fate of the Mueller probe drew renewed attention last week after Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsBiden picks vocal Trump critics to lead immigration agencies The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings Biden administration should resist 'slush-fund' settlements MORE announced he was resigning at President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden to move ahead with billion UAE weapons sale approved by Trump Fox News hires high-profile defense team in Dominion defamation lawsuit Associate indicted in Gaetz scandal cooperating with DOJ: report MORE's request. Trump announced that Whitaker would replace Sessions and would oversee Mueller's investigation, which had previously been supervised by Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinProtect the police or the First Amendment? Rosenstein: Zero tolerance immigration policy 'never should have been proposed or implemented' Comey argues Trump shouldn't be prosecuted after leaving Oval Office MORE

Whitaker's appointment drew scrutiny from those who cited his past public comments criticizing Mueller’s investigation.