Mueller expected to issue more indictments soon: report

Special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSchiff: Trump acquittal in Senate trial would not signal a 'failure' Jeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay MORE is expected to issue more indictments in the coming days as acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker settles into his new role overseeing Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, CBS News reported Tuesday.

“I’ve spoken with many sources with knowledge of the Special Counsel investigation, and we do expect new indictments to be coming as soon as today,” CBS correspondent Paula Reid reported Tuesday. 

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The special counsel has already charged four Americans once affiliated with the Trump campaign and more than a dozen Russians in his inquiry into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Moscow in 2016. 

The report comes one day after Jerome Corsi, a conservative commentator and conspiracy theorist who is an associate of Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneAuthorities prepared to hand over Roger Stone records to media: report Bannon: 'We need the Republican establishment on board' to reelect Trump 2019 in Photos: 35 pictures in politics MORE, stated his belief that he will soon be indicted.

“I’m going to be criminally charged,” Corsi said during a YouTube livestream. “As of today, right now, I expect to be indicted.”

Corsi also said he tried to cooperate with the investigation.

Mueller is investigating Stone’s alleged contacts with WikiLeaks, the group famous for publishing classified government documents. Stone’s interactions with WikiLeaks came under scrutiny after the group released emails during the 2016 presidential election that had been hacked from the Democratic Party and 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump trial begins with clashes, concessions Trump on Clinton's Sanders comments: 'She's the one that people don't like' Hillary Clinton tears open wound with her attack on Sanders MORE's campaign chairman, John Podesta. 

Stone has denied having any prior knowledge of the email dump, maintaining that the information he shared about a potential WikiLeaks release was all publicly available.

The New York Times reported earlier this month that former Trump campaign officials told Mueller that Stone gave the impression that he had a direct line to WikiLeaks. 

The fate of the Mueller probe drew renewed attention last week after Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump-aligned group launches ad campaign hitting Doug Jones on impeachment ICE subpoenas Denver law enforcement: report Bottom Line MORE announced he was resigning at President TrumpDonald John TrumpRouhani says Iran will never seek nuclear weapons Trump downplays seriousness of injuries in Iran attack after US soldiers treated for concussions Trump says Bloomberg is 'wasting his money' on 2020 campaign MORE's request. Trump announced that Whitaker would replace Sessions and would oversee Mueller's investigation, which had previously been supervised by Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinRosenstein says he authorized release of Strzok-Page texts Journalist alleging Obama administration spied on her seeks to reopen case Rosenstein on his time in Trump administration: 'We got all the big issues right' MORE

Whitaker's appointment drew scrutiny from those who cited his past public comments criticizing Mueller’s investigation.