Mueller expected to issue more indictments soon: report

Special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE is expected to issue more indictments in the coming days as acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker settles into his new role overseeing Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, CBS News reported Tuesday.

“I’ve spoken with many sources with knowledge of the Special Counsel investigation, and we do expect new indictments to be coming as soon as today,” CBS correspondent Paula Reid reported Tuesday. 

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The special counsel has already charged four Americans once affiliated with the Trump campaign and more than a dozen Russians in his inquiry into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Moscow in 2016. 

The report comes one day after Jerome Corsi, a conservative commentator and conspiracy theorist who is an associate of Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneHeavily redacted Mueller report leaves major questions unanswered The Hill's Morning Report — Category 5 Mueller storm to hit today Live coverage: Frenzy in DC as Congress, White House brace for Mueller report MORE, stated his belief that he will soon be indicted.

“I’m going to be criminally charged,” Corsi said during a YouTube livestream. “As of today, right now, I expect to be indicted.”

Corsi also said he tried to cooperate with the investigation.

Mueller is investigating Stone’s alleged contacts with WikiLeaks, the group famous for publishing classified government documents. Stone’s interactions with WikiLeaks came under scrutiny after the group released emails during the 2016 presidential election that had been hacked from the Democratic Party and 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGrassroots America shows the people support Donald Trump Ex-FBI official: 'Links and coordination' with Russia happen everyday Ex-FBI agent: Americans should be 'disgusted' by Russian interference in Mueller report MORE's campaign chairman, John Podesta. 

Stone has denied having any prior knowledge of the email dump, maintaining that the information he shared about a potential WikiLeaks release was all publicly available.

The New York Times reported earlier this month that former Trump campaign officials told Mueller that Stone gave the impression that he had a direct line to WikiLeaks. 

The fate of the Mueller probe drew renewed attention last week after Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump: Some statements about him in Mueller report are 'total bulls---' Colbert hits Trump after Mueller report: Innocent people don't say 'I'm f---ed' The Hill's Morning Report — Mueller aftermath: What will House Dems do now? MORE announced he was resigning at President TrumpDonald John TrumpGrassroots America shows the people support Donald Trump Trump speaks to rebel Libyan general attacking Tripoli Dem lawmaker: Mueller report shows 'substantial body of evidence' on obstruction MORE's request. Trump announced that Whitaker would replace Sessions and would oversee Mueller's investigation, which had previously been supervised by Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod Jay RosensteinNew normal: A president can freely interfere with investigations without going to jail Ex-federal prosecutor: Mueller report offers 'knock down case for obstruction' for anyone but Trump Elijah Cummings: 'I am begging the American people to pay attention to what's going on' MORE

Whitaker's appointment drew scrutiny from those who cited his past public comments criticizing Mueller’s investigation.