House Intel votes to release Roger Stone transcript to Mueller

The House Intelligence Committee voted Thursday to release the official witness transcript of Roger StoneRoger Jason Stone3 real problems Republicans need to address to win in 2020 Judge rejects Stone's request to dismiss charges Judge dismisses DNC lawsuit against Trump campaign, Russia over election interference MORE to special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerMueller report fades from political conversation Trump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony MORE's office.

A congressional source told The Hill that committee members voted to hand over the transcript in a unanimous voice vote.

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The Washington Post first reported Wednesday that the special counsel's office had requested the official copy of Stone's transcript from his interview last year with congressional investigators. Former federal prosecutors told the newspaper that it could mean that the special counsel is preparing to charge Stone.

The special counsel's office declined to comment.

Stone, a longtime friend of President TrumpDonald John TrumpGraham: America must 'accept the pain that comes in standing up to China' Weld 'thrilled' more Republicans are challenging Trump New data challenges Trump's economic narrative MORE and a onetime Trump campaign adviser, caught the eye of the special counsel's office after statements he made during the 2016 presidential election in which he suggested he had prior knowledge that WikiLeaks had hacked Democratic emails and would release them ahead of the election.

Stone has denied that he worked with WikiLeaks ahead of the Democratic email dumps. He told The Hill earlier this year that he was tipped off by a source with inside knowledge about the organization who said that it had information that would "roil" the 2016 presidential election.

Stone told The Hill on Thursday that he has not heard from the special counsel's office about the request.

Rep. Mike ConawayKenneth (Mike) Michael ConawayTexas faces turbulent political moment Democratic Party official: Texas is 'biggest battleground state in the country' Another Texas congressman planning to retire MORE (R-Texas), who is overseeing the committee's investigation into Russia's election interference, told reporters after the vote on Thursday that he wasn't sure if the request was from the special counsel's office. Still, he said the committee wouldn't have agreed to hand over the transcript unless the ask was made of them.

Stone's attorney Grant Smith provided The Hill with a copy of a letter sent to House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch 10 declassified Russia collusion revelations that could rock Washington this fall Juan Williams: Trump, his allies and the betrayal of America MORE (R-Calif.) on Wednesday, requesting that, in light of The Washington Post's report on Mueller requesting the transcript, the document be made public immediately.

"Without regard to any decision or action the Committee may take in response to a request by the [special counsel's office], or any other person or agency, for a copy of the Interview transcript, either in whole or in part, Mr. Stone hereby demands the full and immediate release to the general public of the Transcript, such that the American citizenry and the world are able to evaluate for themselves Mr. Stone’s veracity," the letter reads. 

The committee previously voted to release the transcripts of witness interviews in the probe. Those records are currently under review by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence before they can be released.

Stone is facing increased scrutiny from Democratic lawmakers on the committee, who have recently said that the former Trump campaign adviser may have lied while testifying under oath.

Those lawmakers, including likely incoming panel Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffHillicon Valley: YouTube disables 200+ accounts over Hong Kong misinformation | Lawmakers sound alarm over Chinese influence efforts | DHS cyber agency details priorities | State AGs get tough on robocalls | DOJ busts online scammers Nadler asks other House chairs to provide records that would help panel in making impeachment decision YouTube disables over 200 accounts amid protests in Hong Kong MORE (D-Calif.), claim that Stone's statements under oath are at odds with publicly released emails about WikiLeaks exchanged between him and fellow Mueller probe witness Jerome Corsi. 

Stone has repeatedly denied that he lied before the committee, saying that he did not amend his testimony but only updated it with information that backs up his version of events.

WikiLeaks's release of hacked Democratic emails in the lead up to the 2016 presidential election has been an area of focus for Mueller. Earlier this year, he indicted 12 Russian military officers in the 2016 hack of the Democratic National Committee (DNC). Several of those officers were sanctioned by the Treasury Department for alleged election interference on Wednesday.

Stone has also been an area of intensive interest for the special counsel, who has subpoenaed and questioned several of the Trump ally's associates.

And Stone recently rebuffed a request from the Senate to appear before and hand over documents to investigators, asserting his Fifth Amendment rights.

Stone also said that he would not testify against the president, earning him a tweet from Trump praising the move.

—Updated at 12:10 p.m.