GOP announces members who will serve on House intel panel

GOP announces members who will serve on House intel panel
© Greg Nash

Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyFormer Speaker Boehner's official portrait unveiled Saagar Enjeti blasts alleged Epstein cover-up by media Harris introduces bill to prevent California wildfires MORE (R-Calif.) on Wednesday announced the names of Republican members who will serve on the House Intelligence Committee, which will allow the panel to become constituted and be ready for business.

The new GOP addition to the committee is Rep. John RatcliffeJohn Lee RatcliffeTrump calls latest impeachment hearings 'a great day for Republicans' Five things to know about Tuesday's impeachment hearings Live coverage: House holds third day of public impeachment hearings MORE (R-Texas), a former federal prosecutor who also serves on the House Judiciary Committee. 

"My appointment to HPSCI will allow me to bring my background as a former U.S. Attorney and federal terrorism prosecutor to oversight that encompasses the broader intelligence community of our U.S. government and military," Ratcliffe said in a statement, referring to the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.

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Rep. Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesThe Memo: GOP plays risky game with attacks on Vindman Five things to know about Tuesday's impeachment hearings Nunes complains Democrats adding extra time for questioning witnesses MORE (D-Calif.), who previously chaired the committee, will stay on as ranking member.

And GOP Reps. Mike ConawayKenneth (Mike) Michael ConawayLive coverage: House holds third day of public impeachment hearings Audience applauds, GOP microphone turned off at end of Yovanovitch hearing Democrats say Trump tweet is 'witness intimidation,' fuels impeachment push MORE (Texas), Brad WenstrupBrad Robert WenstrupSix memorable moments from Ex-Ukraine ambassador Yovanovitch's public testimony Live coverage: Ex-Ukraine ambassador testifies in public impeachment hearing Washington celebrates diplomacy — and baseball — at Meridian Ball MORE (Ohio), Mike TurnerMichael Ray TurnerSunday shows — Spotlight shifts to Sondland ahead of impeachment inquiry testimony House Intelligence Republican: Trump Yovanovitch tweet 'not witness intimidation' Five takeaways from ex-ambassador's dramatic testimony MORE (Ohio), Chris StewartChristopher (Chris) Douglas StewartVindman clashes with GOP Trump on Vindman: 'I understand now he wears his uniform when he goes in' Live coverage: House holds third day of public impeachment hearings MORE (Utah), Rick CrawfordRichard (Rick) CrawfordThis week: House kicks off public phase of impeachment inquiry House Republicans add Jordan to Intel panel for impeachment probe Republican Congressman: DNI Nominee committed to declassification transparency MORE (Ark.), Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikTrump calls latest impeachment hearings 'a great day for Republicans' Conway and Haley get into heated feud: 'You'll say anything to get the vice-presidential nomination' Impeachment hearings likely to get worse for Republicans MORE (R-N.Y.), and Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdImpeachment hearings likely to get worse for Republicans The Hill's 12:30 Report: Democrats open televised impeachment hearings Here are the key players to watch at impeachment hearing MORE (Texas) will all also remain on the committee.

Conaway, who led the panel's Russia probe after Nunes stepped aside, had to receive a waiver in order to continue serving on the committee after surpassing the panel's time limit set for serving members.

Rep. Pete KingPeter (Pete) KingRetiring lawmaker's 2018 opponent won't run for seat, citing 'difficult' pregnancies House panel advances flavored e-cigarette ban Hillicon Valley: Schumer questions Army over use of TikTok | Federal court rules against random searches of travelers' phones | Groups push for election security funds in stopgap bill | Facebook's new payment feature | Disney+ launch hit by glitches MORE (R-N.Y.) will no longer serve on the panel. He, too, would have required a waiver in order to remain on the panel.

The committee is expected to be ground zero for investigations into President TrumpDonald John TrumpDem senator says Zelensky was 'feeling the pressure' to probe Bidens 2020 Dems slam Trump decision on West Bank settlements Trump calls latest impeachment hearings 'a great day for Republicans' MORE's possible ties to Russia as well as the president's business dealings.

The committee can now organize and become fully constituted ahead of the panel's closed-door meeting next Friday with President Trump's former personal lawyer Michael Cohen. 

Democrats had named the new Democratic members to the high-profile panel nearly two weeks ago. They include Reps. Val DemingsValdez (Val) Venita DemingsHaley: Giuliani should've been named 'special envoy' to Ukraine Sunday shows - Second whistleblower grabs spotlight House Democrat: Trump 'dangerously abused his oath of office' MORE (Fla.), Raja Krishnamoorthi (Ill.), Sean Patrick Maloney (N.Y.), and Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchImpeachment hearing breaks into laughter after Democrat contrasts it to Hallmark movie Diplomat ties Trump closer to Ukraine furor Impeachment hearing breaks into laughter after Democrat invites Trump to testify MORE (Vt.).

Rep. Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffFive things to know about Tuesday's impeachment hearings Nunes complains Democrats adding extra time for questioning witnesses Volker says he rejected Biden 'conspiracy theory' pushed by Giuliani MORE (D-Calif.), the chairman of the high-profile panel, indicated that those two weeks without GOP members have made an impact.

“We had a briefing today on hot spots around the world, classified briefing and none of the Republican members were there. So they’re also cutting themselves off from good information,” Schiff told CNN and The Hill on Wednesday.

But before either side announced new members, lawmakers quietly grumbled that the shutdown had delayed House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOvernight Health Care: GOP senator says drug price action unlikely this year | House panel weighs ban on flavored e-cigs | New York sues Juul Five things to know about Tuesday's impeachment hearings McConnell hopes Senate impeachment trial 'not too lengthy a process' MORE (D-Calif.) and McCarthy's ability to suss out who would serve on which committee.

The first few weeks, according to a Democratic committee source, will be orientation.

The source told The Hill that the panel will prioritize Russia, authoritarianism, and "vigorous oversight" of the Trump administration, but noted that the roadmap of which investigatory actions to pursue, and in which order, is still being decided.

The source also said the subcommittees for intelligence will be different than under Nunes.

There will be four subcommittees that will oversee: technological problems like artificial intelligence; counter-intelligence, proliferation, and terrorism; intelligence management and reform, including security clearances; and then finally, defense and war fighter support. 

Schiff, who has stated that the panel's first order of business will be to vote to release transcripts from the panel's witness interviews to special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSpeier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump Gowdy: I '100 percent' still believe public congressional hearings are 'a circus' Comey: Mueller 'didn't succeed in his mission because there was inadequate transparency' MORE. He indicated that will be done once the committee is up and running.

"We will be adopting rules and doing some other things, so whether that will be the first meeting or the second meeting, I cannot say," Schiff said.