Controversial NSA phone program shut down: report

Controversial NSA phone program shut down: report
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The National Security Agency (NSA) has reportedly ended a program that analyzes logs of domestic calls and texts made by Americans. 

Luke Murry, a Republican national security adviser in the House and an adviser to Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthySunday shows preview: White House, congressional Democrats unable to breach stalemate over coronavirus relief A trillion stimulus, but Kevin McCarthy for renewable energy — leading businesses want to change that When will telling the truth in politics matter again? MORE (R-Calif.), said the program hasn't been used for months and that President TrumpDonald John TrumpDeWine tests negative for coronavirus a second time Several GOP lawmakers express concern over Trump executive orders Beirut aftermath poses test for US aid to frustrating ally MORE may not ask Congress to renew its legal authority, according to The New York Times.

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Murry told the Times during a Lawfare podcast that the Trump administration “hasn’t actually been using it for the past six months."

“I’m actually not certain that the administration will want to start that back up,” Murry reportedly added.

The NSA on Monday declined to comment to the Times. A spokesman for McCarthy's office told the newspaper that Murry “was not speaking on behalf of administration policy or what Congress intends to do on this issue.”

The program was originally launched by former President George W. Bush as part of an effort to find terrorists following the 2001 terrorist attacks, according to the Times.

Former NSA contractor and whistleblower Ed Snowden disclosed the existence of the program in 2013.

The program collected more than 530 million U.S. call records in 2017.