Top Mueller deputy leaving office in sign Russia probe may be winding down

Top Mueller deputy leaving office in sign Russia probe may be winding down
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A top prosecutor investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and possible ties between President TrumpDonald John TrumpWHCA calls on Trump to denounce video depicting him shooting media outlets Video of fake Trump shooting members of media shown at his Miami resort: report Trump hits Fox News's Chris Wallace over Ukraine coverage MORE's campaign and Moscow is reportedly leaving special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerFox News legal analyst says Trump call with Ukraine leader could be 'more serious' than what Mueller 'dragged up' Lewandowski says Mueller report was 'very clear' in proving 'there was no obstruction,' despite having 'never' read it Fox's Cavuto roasts Trump over criticism of network MORE's office and the Department of Justice.

NPR first reported reported Thursday that Andrew Weissmann will teach at New York University and work on public service projects. 

Peter Carr, a spokesman for the special counsel's office, told The Hill in an email: "Andrew Weissmann will be concluding his detail to the Special Counsel’s Office in the near future." 

Carr declined to comment further on the details of Weissmann's departure. 

NPR reported that the departure is a sign that Mueller and his team are nearing the end of their work.

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Weissmann, a top lieutenant to Mueller in the probe, took the lead in the case against former Trump campaign chairman Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortRand Paul calls for probe of Democrats over Ukraine letter He who must not be named: How Hunter Biden became a conversation-stopper Schiff should consider using RICO framework to organize impeachment MORE. Manafort faces 7 1/2 years in prison after he was sentenced by a federal judge in Virginia last week and a federal judge in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday.

Trump has long decried the special counsel's investigation, often calling it a "witch hunt" and maintaining that his campaign did not collude with Russia. 

The special counsel has indicted, convicted or secured guilty pleas from several of Trump's former associates, including Manafort, informal Trump adviser Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneMeet Trump's most trusted pollsters 3 real problems Republicans need to address to win in 2020 Judge rejects Stone's request to dismiss charges MORE, Trump's former personal attorney Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenTrump's tirades, taunts and threats are damaging our democracy Maxine Waters: Trump should be imprisoned and 'placed in solitary confinement' Michael Cohen denies Omarosa advising him in prison MORE and former deputy Trump campaign manager Richard Gates.

NPR noted that Weissmann's departure comes after a top FBI agent in the investigation, David Archey, left the special counsel's office earlier this month to start a new job in Richmond, Va. Multiple other prosecutors have also left the office in recent months, including Scott Meisler, Kyle Freeny and Brandon Van Grack.

Additionally, NPR reported that WilmerHale, the firm that Mueller and multiple other prosecutors left to join the special counsel, is expecting the return of some of its ex-partners.

Excluding Mueller, the special counsel's office now has 12 attorneys on staff.

At NYU, Weissmann — who years ago was part of the federal task force that investigated Enron — is expected to work on improving forensic science standards used in courts in an effort to reduce wrongful convictions, according to the network. 

Updated at 11:32 a.m.