Mueller delivers report to Justice, ending investigation

Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerFox News legal analyst says Trump call with Ukraine leader could be 'more serious' than what Mueller 'dragged up' Lewandowski says Mueller report was 'very clear' in proving 'there was no obstruction,' despite having 'never' read it Fox's Cavuto roasts Trump over criticism of network MORE has delivered his confidential report to Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrPelosi releases 'fact sheet' saying Trump has 'betrayed his oath of office' Federal prosecutors interviewed multiple FBI officials for Russia probe review: report Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe MORE, signaling the end of a two-year investigation that has dominated President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says he doesn't want NYT in the White House Veterans group backs lawsuits to halt Trump's use of military funding for border wall Schiff punches back after GOP censure resolution fails MORE’s term in office.

Barr told the House and Senate Judiciary Committees that he is reviewing the report and "may be in a position to advise you of the Special Counsel's principal conclusions as soon as this weekend," according to a letter circulated by the Justice Department. 

Barr said he intends to consult with Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinTrump attacks Sessions: A 'total disaster' and 'an embarrassment to the great state of Alabama' Mueller rejoins DC law firm Lewandowski says Mueller report was 'very clear' in proving 'there was no obstruction,' despite having 'never' read it MORE and Mueller "to determine what information from the report can be released to Congress and the public consistent with the law." 

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The White House said Trump has not been briefed on the report.

“The next steps are up to Attorney General Barr, and we look forward to the process taking its course," White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement. "The White House has not received or been briefed on the Special Counsel’s report.”

Trump's personal attorneys, Rudy Giuliani and Jay Sekulow, also said they were awaiting Barr's decision.

“We’re pleased that the Office of Special Counsel has delivered its report to the Attorney General pursuant to the regulations," the two said in a statement. "Attorney General Barr will determine the appropriate next steps.”

The attorney general said during his confirmation hearing that he would make public as much about Mueller’s inquiry as possible consistent with the law, but he was careful not to commit to releasing the report in its entirety.

"I remain committed to as much transparency as possible, and I will keep you informed at to the status of my review,” Barr wrote in the letter sent to the congressional committees Friday evening.

Barr also said there were no instances during which he blocked Mueller from taking certain steps in the course of his investigations; he was required to report to Congress of any such actions and explain them under the regulations governing the special counsel.

Trump has said he will defer to Barr, who was confirmed in February, on whether to release Mueller’s report, but has continued to attack the investigation.

“I have a deputy, appoints a man to write a report on me, to make a determination on my presidency,” Trump said in an interview with Fox Business Network airing Friday. “People will not stand for it.”

Weeks of speculation that Mueller was close to wrapping up culminated in Friday's announcement, which brings to a close an investigation that has dogged Trump for nearly two years. 

Mueller has not recommended any future indictments. 

The Mueller probe began shortly after Trump fired FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyCNN's Jeffrey Toobin says he regrets role in playing up Clinton email story Federal prosecutors interviewed multiple FBI officials for Russia probe review: report State cites 38 people for violations in Clinton email review MORE, who was in charge of the bureau’s original investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

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Mueller’s investigation explored the possibility that Trump’s campaign coordinated with Moscow to interfere in the election, and whether Trump obstructed justice.

Mueller, a former FBI director himself who earned broad respect from current and former officials as well as members of Congress, has proceeded with his probe quietly for 22 months amid frequent and biting attacks from the president and his allies.

Mueller has secured a conviction against former Trump campaign chairman Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortNew York City lawmakers vote to close Rikers Island jail by 2026 Perry says Trump directed him to discuss Ukraine with Giuliani: report Cuomo signs measure allowing New York to press charges despite presidential pardon MORE and guilty pleas from former Trump campaign aide Richard Gates, former national security adviser Michael Flynn and Trump’s former personal attorney Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenTrump offers condolences on frequent foe Cummings: 'Very hard, if not impossible, to replace' Elijah Cummings, Democratic chairman and powerful Trump critic, dies at 68 Schiff says committees will eventually make impeachment inquiry transcripts public MORE.

Manafort, who at one point cooperated with Mueller, was sentenced to a total of 7 1/2 years in prison in mid-March.

Still, none of the offenses alleged by prosecutors included conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Moscow to meddle in the election, leaving the question at the heart of the special counsel’s probe unanswered.

Trump has also long denied that his campaign colluded with the Kremlin to interfere in the election. He has consistently derided the investigation as a “witch hunt,” casting it as a probe run by officials biased against him. The president publicly berated his first attorney general, Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump attacks Sessions: A 'total disaster' and 'an embarrassment to the great state of Alabama' Ocasio-Cortez fires back at Washington Times after story on her 'high-dollar hairdo' Trump's tirades, taunts and threats are damaging our democracy MORE, for recusing himself from the investigation, attacks that eventually precipitated Sessions’s resignation last November.

Six associates of Trump and his campaign were ultimately charged in connection the investigation with false statements, obstruction, financial crimes and other offenses. 

Republican operative Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneJudge rules prosecutors can't show 'Godfather' clip at Roger Stone's trial Meet Trump's most trusted pollsters 3 real problems Republicans need to address to win in 2020 MORE, a longtime friend and informal adviser to Trump, was the most recent person to be charged in the investigation for lying about his communications regarding WikiLeaks and other offenses. Stone plans to fight the charges and is slated for a November trial in federal court in Washington, D.C.

Mueller also unveiled charges against more than a dozen Russians who ran a troll farm in St. Petersburg, Russia, that spread divisive content to American audiences on social media as part of a broader plot to interfere in the election. And the special counsel indicted 12 Russian intelligence officers for hacking the emails of high-level Democrats.

Now that Mueller has concluded his probe, the focus will shift to Barr and what he does with the special counsel's findings. House Democrats have signaled they are prepared for a fight with the Justice Department if they are unsatisfied with what Barr releases about the special counsel's investigation. 

"After nearly two years of investigation — accompanied by two years of unprecedented attacks on the integrity of the investigation by President Trump — the public and Congress are entitled to know what the Special Counsel has found," six House committee chairs said in a statement Friday evening.

"The Justice Department must now release to the public the entire report submitted by Special Counsel Mueller to the Attorney General," they said.

Updated 8:30 p.m.