Nadler says he will call on Barr to testify over DOJ handling of Mueller report

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerHouse passes bill that would give legal status to thousands of undocumented farmworkers Collins accusing Democrats of 'tearing down a world leader' GOP calls for minority hearing on impeachment, threatens procedural measures MORE (D-N.Y.) said Sunday that his committee will call Attorney General William Barr to testify over “very concerning discrepancies and final decision making” at the Justice Department over special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump says he'll release financial records before election, knocks Dems' efforts House impeachment hearings: The witch hunt continues Speier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump MORE’s report.

“In light of the very concerning discrepancies and final decision making at the Justice Department following the Special Counsel report, where Mueller did not exonerate the President, we will be calling Attorney General Barr in to testify before @HouseJudiciary in the near future,” Nadler tweeted Sunday.

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The statement was made shortly after Barr sent a letter to Congress notifying leaders of the conclusions of Mueller’s report on his investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 election.

In the letter, Barr wrote that Mueller found that no one affiliated with the Trump campaign “conspired or coordinated with Russia in its efforts to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election.”

He also said that Mueller did not clear Trump from the possibility he obstructed justice; however, Barr wrote that he and Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinRosenstein, Sessions discussed firing Comey in late 2016 or early 2017: FBI notes Justice Dept releases another round of summaries from Mueller probe Judge rules former WH counsel McGahn must testify under subpoena MORE found that Mueller’s evidence was “not sufficient” to bring an obstruction of justice charge against Trump.

The Hill has reached out to the Department of Justice (DOJ) for comment.

Mueller submitted a report on his findings in his investigation into Russia's election interference to Barr on Friday.

Barr wrote in the letter Sunday that the DOJ will spend the coming days identifying information in the Mueller report that cannot be publicly released, such as grand jury information and evidence from investigations that have to be referred to other offices, before making further decisions on how much of Mueller's report can be released.

Some Democrats are already demanding that the entire report, as well as the evidence used to reach its conclusions, be made public.

Nadler tweeted Sunday that the Justice Department "owes the public more than just a brief synopsis and decision not to go any further in their work."

"Special Counsel Mueller worked for 22 months to determine the extent to which President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Democrats worried by Jeremy Corbyn's UK rise amid anti-Semitism Warren, Buttigieg duke it out in sprint to 2020 MORE obstructed justice. Attorney General Barr took 2 days to tell the American people that while the President is not exonerated, there will be no action by DOJ," he wrote.

Republicans and the White House have seized on the report's finding to claim that the president is vindicated.

“The findings of the Department of Justice are a total and complete exoneration of the president of the United States,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement.

And the president also tweeted that there was "Complete and Total EXONERATION."

Updated at 4:53 p.m.