Barr to testify before Congress Tuesday on budget request

Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrPelosi says she will view less-redacted version of Mueller report Pelosi says she will view less-redacted version of Mueller report The Hill's Morning Report - Trump's reelection message: Promises kept MORE will testify before Congress on Tuesday about the Justice Department’s fiscal 2020 budget request as he faces growing questions from House Democrats concerning the findings of special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerKamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Kamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump MORE’s investigation.

Barr is scheduled to testify publicly before members of the House Appropriations Committee alongside Assistant Attorney General for Administration Lee Lofthus at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday.

Barr and Lofthus are also scheduled to testify the following day before the Senate Appropriations Committee at 10 a.m. on the department's budget request.

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The hearings come as Barr weathers tremendous scrutiny from Democrats over news reports suggesting some of Mueller’s investigators have complained privately about Barr's four-page summary laying out Mueller’s findings. Some on Mueller's team reportedly have said Barr's letter did not adequately capture what investigators found and conveyed a more positive picture of President TrumpDonald John TrumpBooker hits Biden's defense of remarks about segregationist senators: 'He's better than this' Booker hits Biden's defense of remarks about segregationist senators: 'He's better than this' Trump says Democrats are handing out subpoenas 'like they're cookies' MORE's behavior than Mueller’s report lays out.

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Barr was thrust into the spotlight last month when Mueller concluded his 22-month investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and submitted his confidential report to the attorney general.

Barr issued a summary of what he described as Mueller’s core findings on March 24, revealing the special counsel did not find sufficient evidence to charge anyone associated with Trump’s campaign with conspiring with Russia.

Barr also deemed the evidence laid out in Mueller’s report as insufficient to accuse Trump of obstructing justice; the special counsel did not come to a conclusion one way or another, and the report explicitly does not “exonerate” Trump on obstruction, according to Barr’s letter.

Trump and Republicans have seized on Barr's letter as exonerating the president.  

House Democrats are calling on Barr to release Mueller’s full report to Congress, without any redactions to conceal grand jury material or other sensitive details.

The House Judiciary Committee voted along party lines to authorize its chairman, Rep. Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerHouse hearing marks historic moment for slavery reparations debate Want the truth? Put your money on Bill Barr, not Jerry Nadler From abortion to obstruction, politicians' hypocrisy is showing MORE (D-N.Y.), to subpoena the report and its underlying evidence if the Justice Department does not satisfy Democrats’ demands. 

Barr has said he plans to release a version of Mueller’s report publicly and to Congress by mid-April, which will be redacted to restrict grand jury material, classified information, details about ongoing investigations and information on “peripheral third parties.”

Barr has also agreed to testify before the House and Senate judiciary committees about Mueller's report in early May. 

Barr will testify Tuesday before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice and Science. 

Updated at 1:41 p.m.